Bert Schneider
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Notable deaths of 2011: Film and television

The iconoclastic producer of “Easy Rider,” “Five Easy Pieces,” “The Last Picture Show” and the Oscar-winning “Hearts and Minds” helped filmmakers break out of the studio system. Schneider also co-created the Monkees, the popular made-for-TV rock quartet modeled on the Beatles who starred in their own Emmy-winning sitcom from 1966 to 1968. He was 78. Full obituary

Notable film and television deaths of 2011 (Associated Press)
Emmy Award-winning Harry Morgan played LAPD Officer Bill Gannon opposite Jack Webb in “Dragnet” and Col. Sherman T. Potter in the hit series “MASH.” He also appeared on the Broadway stage and in more than 50 films. Above, Morgan, right, with “MASH” costars Alan Alda and Mike Farrell. He was 96. Full obituary

Notable film and television deaths of 2011 ()
Sues was a campy regular on “Rowan & Martin‘s Laugh-In,” playing characters including effeminate sportscaster Big Al and perpetually hung-over children’s show host Uncle Al the Kiddies’ Pal. He was 85. Full obituary

Notable film and television deaths of 2011 (Associated Press)
The character actor carved out a career playing rough-and-tumble villains, most notably the backwoods man who sexually assaults Ned Beatty‘s character in the 1972 film “Deliverance.” He also appeared in a string of Clint Eastwood movies -- “The Outlaw Josey Wales,” “The Gauntlet,” “Every Which Way but Loose,” “Bronco Billy” and “Any Which Way You Can.” He was 80. Full obituary

Notable film and television deaths of 2011 (File photo)
The director of “Women in Love,” Russell was described as an enfant terrible of British cinema, specializing in films about musicians and music, notably the Who’s “Tommy.” Above, Russell with British model Twiggy during the filming of the movie “The Boy Friend” in 1971. He was 84. Full obituary

Notable film and television deaths of 2011 (Associated Press)
His end-of-show essays on “60 Minutes” turned him into a reluctant celebrity. TV Guide called him “America’s favorite grump.” He retired in October after 33 years on the show. He was 92. Full obituary

Notable film and television deaths of 2010 (Los Angeles Times)
A legendary producer, director and impresario of the Geffen Playhouse, Gil Cates restored the luster to the Academy Awards telecasts, recruiting hosts such as Billy Crystal and Steve Martin. He was 77. Full obituary

Notable film and television deaths of 2011 (Kevork Djansezian / Associated Press)
A top talent agent, Mengers was a skilled negotiator known for being tough and uncensored in her style. She blazed a trail for women in Hollywood. She was 79. Full obituary

Notable film and television deaths of 2011 (Los Angeles Times)
Starting as an actress later in life, Frances Bay found success in a series of character parts, including roles on “Happy Days” and “Seinfeld” and in David Lynch‘s films. Above, she plays Adam Sandler‘s grandmother in “Happy Gilmore.” She was 92. Full obituary

Notable film and television deaths of 2011 (Joseph Lederer)
John Calley ran Warner Bros., United Artists and Sony Pictures and produced several notable films, including “The Remains of the Day,” “Catch-22" and “The Da Vinci Code,” in a long career capped in 2009 by an honorary Academy Award. He was 81. Full obituary

Notable film and television deaths of 2010  (Los Angeles Times)
The actor won an Oscar for “Charly,” played JFK in “PT 109" and exposed the check-forging scandal of David Begelman. He was 88. Full obituary

Notable film and television deaths of 2010  (Associated Press)
The Oscar-nominated art director was best known for her work on “The Last Picture Show” and “Paper Moon,” both directed by former husband Peter Bogdanovich. She also was an executive in filmmaker James L. Brooks’ company. She was 72. Full obituary

Notable film and television deaths of 2010  (Bob Chamberlin / Los Angeles Times)
The veteran character actor, a former Oklahoma oilman who didn’t begin acting until he was in his 40s, was known for playing authority figures, including roles in “The Godfather: Part II” and “Apocalypse Now.” He was 90. Full obituary

Notable film and television deaths of 2010  (Universal / Lorimar)
The comedy writer and producer created “Gilligan’s Island” and “The Brady Bunch. " He also wrote the memorable theme-song lyrics for both the wacky tale of a shipwrecked “three-hour tour” and the story of the marriage between a “lovely lady” with three daughters and “a man named Brady” with three sons. Above, Schwartz in 2008 receives kisses from Florence Henderson, who played Mrs. Brady, and Dawn Wells, who played Mary Ann on “Gilligan’s Island.” He was 94. Full obituary

Notable film and television deaths of 2011 (Nick Ut / Associated Press)
The gravel-voiced Falk had a more than 50-year acting career that spanned movies, stage and TV. He became an enduring television icon portraying Lt. Columbo, the rumpled raincoat-wearing Los Angeles police homicide detective who always had “just one more thing” to ask a suspect. He was 83. Full obituary

Notable film and television deaths of 2011 (Universal Pictures)
The film producer blazed a trail for women in Hollywood and overcame obstacles to get the “Spider-Man” movies made. In doing so, she paved the way for the superhero fare now standard during the summer filmgoing season. She was 61. Full obituary

Notable film and television deaths of 2010  ()
Best known for his role as Marshal Matt Dillon in “Gunsmoke,” one of the longest-running prime-time series in network TV history, Arness was a towering symbol of frontier justice in the series that broke the mold for TV westerns. He was 88. Full obituary

Notable film and television deaths of 2011 (CBS)
Jeff Conaway came to fame in the movie “Grease” and on TV’s “Taxi.” More recently he was known for appearances on “Celebrity Rehab With Dr. Drew.” He was 60. Full obituary

Notable film and television deaths of 2011 ()
The playwright and Broadway director, who won two Tony Awards, wrote the books for the classic Broadway musicals “West Side Story” and “Gypsy.” His screen credits include “The Way We Were” and “Rope.” He was believed to be 93. Full obituary

Notable film and television deaths of 2010  ()
A child star in the ‘30s and part of the “Our Gang” cast, Jackie Cooper evolved into a successful 1950s TV star, a top ‘60s TV studio executive and an Emmy-winning director in the ‘70s. He was 88. Full obituary

Notable film and television deaths of 2011 (MGM)
The “I Love Lucy” writer collaborated with partner Bob Carroll Jr. on the groundbreaking series in the 1950s and continued to work with Lucille Ball over four decades. The pioneering female comedy writer is remembered as a “class act.” She was 90. Full obituary

Notable film and television deaths of 2011 (Los Angeles Times)
The Canadian actor may be best known for his role in 1969’s “They Shoot Horses, Don’t They?” with Jane Fonda, above. His other film credits include “The Sweet Ride,” “The Pursuit of Happiness” and “The Gumball Rally.” He was 70. Full obituary

Notable film and television deaths of 2010  (File photo)
The son of Groucho Marx went his own way with his career, becoming a TV writer, playwright and celebrity biographer; but his favorite, recurring subject was his famous father. He was 89. Full obituary

Notable film and television deaths of 2010  (Los Angeles Times)
The handsome leading man was best known for roles in Hitchcock films. He began his acting career as a teenager in 1943’s “The North Star” (pictured) and went on to star in such movies as “They Live by Night” and Hitchcock’s “Rope” and “Strangers on a Train.” He later appeared on Broadway and in a range of TV roles. He was 85. Full obituary

Notable film and television deaths of 2010  (File photo)
The legendary star of stage and screen who won two Oscars, married multiple times, became a successful businesswoman and helped to pioneer the fight against AIDS, died of congestive heart failure. She was 79. Full obituary

Notable film and television deaths of 2010  (Associated Press)
The former Hollywood press agent made a successful leap to producing. Seltzer led successful ad campaigns for 1935’s “Mutiny on the Bounty” and 1955’s “Marty” and later helped Charlton Heston make “Soylent Green” and “The Omega Man.” In retirement he was a tenacious fundraiser for the Motion Picture and Television Fund. Above, he receives the Fund’s Silver Medallion from actors Burt Lancaster, left, and Kirk Douglas. He was 96. Full obituary

Notable film and television deaths of 2010  (File photo)
The versatile comedic actress was in MGM musicals and a regular on “All in the Family” and “Laverne & Shirley.” She also starred on Broadway and in Los Angeles theater productions. She was 91. Full obituary

Notable film and television deaths of 2011 (Columbia Pictures)
The composer won five Oscars for films such as “Born Free” and “Out of Africa” and scored Bond films including “Goldfinger,” “Diamonds Are Forever” and “From Russia With Love.” His work on the Bond franchise put him in the forefront of music composers. He was 77. Full obituary

Notable film and television deaths of 2010  (Dave Hogan / Getty Images)
Maria Schneider starred in “Last Tango in Paris.” The film is considered a classic, but it also included notorious sex scenes. In her later years, Schneider expressed regret about appearing in the film, saying “I felt a little raped” by costar Marlon Brando and director Bernardo Bertolucci. She was 58. Full obituary

Notable film and television deaths of 2011 (United Artists)
The zany, character-oriented comedian’s visual brand of humor was punctuated with a bizarre array of facial expressions and sound effects. Mel Brooks says he “was a cast of thousands all by himself.” He was 83. Full obituary

Notable film and television deaths of 2010  (Joey Del Valle/NBCU Photo Bank)
Don Kirshner guided the careers of songwriters, launched the Monkees and introduced TV audiences to an array of musicians and comics through his show in the 1970s. He was 76. Full obituary

Notable film and television deaths of 2010  (Joshua Prezan t/ Washington Post)
British actress Susannah York rose to fame in the 1960s for her work in such films as “They Shoot Horses, Don’t They?” for which she was nominated for an Oscar. She was 72. Full obituary

Notable film and television deaths of 2010  (Los Angeles Times)
David Nelson and his brother, Rick, joined their parents on “The Adventures of Ozzie and Harriet” on radio in 1949. The show moved to TV in 1952 and ran for 14 years. David Nelson later became a director. He was 74. Full obituary

Notable film and television deaths of 2011 (Los Angeles Times)
The British director earned Academy Award nominations for “Breaking Away” and “The Dresser.” “Bullitt” was Yates’ American directing debut. It starred Steve McQueen as a detective and featured a memorable car chase on the streets of San Francisco with McQueen at the wheel of a Mustang. He was 81. Full obituary

Notable film and television deaths of 2010  (Bob Chamberlin / Los Angeles Times)
The actor was nominated for an Oscar for “In the Name of the Father.” Steven Spielberg, who directed Postlethwaite in “The Lost World: Jurassic Park” and “Amistad,” once called him “probably the best actor in the world.” Full obituary

Notable film and television deaths of 2010  (Los Angeles Times)
A shapely blond with a beauty mark next to her lower lip, the New York native costarred in the 1950s science-fiction classic “Forbidden Planet.” She also played the title role in “Honey West,” the mid-1960s TV series about a sexy female private detective with a pet ocelot. She was 80. Full obituary

Notable film and television deaths of 2011 (Universal Television)
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