Rebirth of Colonial Drug
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New life for old corner drugstore

Rebirth of Colonial Drug
Volunteers Daniele Pineda and her husband Carlo clean decades of dust from early 20th century medicine bottles. Here in the pharmacy of the Colonial Drug museum at Heritage Square in Highland Park, visitors will be able to watch a video about the business once owned and operated by the Simmons family.  (Don Bartletti / Los Angeles Times)
Rebirth of Colonial Drug
A 1928 photograph of George Simmons, center, inside his Colonial Drug in Highland Park. The layout of the original store is the inspiration for the museum at Heritage Square. ()
Rebirth of Colonial Drug
Sid Simmons, 90, prepares early 1900s medicine bottles for display in the new Colonial Drug museum at Heritage Square. Simmons is fussy about the condition of the labels, corks and contents but chooses the best from tens of thousands in his collection. Many are from his father’s original store in Highland Park. (Don Bartletti / Los Angeles Times)
Rebirth of Colonial Drug
A display of late 19th and early 20th century healthcare remedies in the Colonial Drug museum at Heritage Square. (Don Bartletti / Los Angeles Times)
Rebirth of Colonial Drug
Daniele Pineda inspects the cork of an early 1900s medicine bottle that reads “Pill and Tablets W.R. Warner & Co., Philad’a”.  (Don Bartletti / Los Angeles Times)
Rebirth of Colonial Drug
Sid Simmons, 90, and his collection of early 1900s medicine bottles in the “pharmacy” of the new Colonial Drug museum at Heritage Square. The contents are original and the most items have never been opened. (Don Bartletti / Los Angeles Times)
Rebirth of Colonial Drug
A file cabinet drawer in the pharmacy holds bottles whose labels list ingredients such as morphine, narcotine, and phenobarbital-- and a warning, “MAY BE HABIT FORMING”. (Don Bartletti / Los Angeles Times)
Rebirth of Colonial Drug
A 1906 photograph of the Bank of Highland Park at the corner of Avenue 57 and Figueroa Street. About 1928 the building was purchased by the Simmons family and it became Colonial Drug. ()
Rebirth of Colonial Drug
John Kearns, development manager of the Heritage Museum in Los Angeles, and Linda Simmons prepare for the opening of a replica of the original early 1900s-era Colonial Drug store that Linda’s husband’s grandfather once operated in Highland Park. (Don Bartletti / Los Angeles Times)
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