P-22 near Griffith Park
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A mountain lion has settled in Griffith Park

P-22 near Griffith Park
This is the first photographic evidence of mountain lion P-22 in the Griffith Park area, taken Feb. 12 at 9:15 p.m. The photo was taken using a remote camera operated by Cooper Ecological Monitoring for the Griffith Park Wildlife Connectivity Study, which is evaluating the movement of mammals through wildlife corridors that may connect Griffith Park to neighboring natural areas.  (Griffith Park Connectivity Study)
P-22 near Griffith Park
A National Park Service photograph shows P-22 near Griffith Park. The park service took a genetic sample of P-22 and concluded that the lion was probably from the Santa Monica Mountains, which would mean he crossed both the 405 and 101 freeways to get to Griffith Park. (National Park Service)
Tracking P-22
Jeff Sikich, wildlife biologist with the National Park Service, walks a trail in Griffith Park near the observatory to access remote cameras used to monitor possible activity by mountain lion P-22. Sikich and his team captured and radio-collared the lion near Griffith Park on March 28, but the GPS has stopped functioning.  (Al Seib / Los Angeles Times)
Radio-telemetry
Jeff Sikich, wildlife biologist with the National Park Service, uses a radio receiver near Griffith Park to monitor possible activity by mountain lion P-22. Sikich is using radio telemetry to monitor P-22 and hopes to recapture the lion to attach a new GPS.  (Al Seib / Los Angeles Times)
Remote cameras
Biology tech Matt Whitmire, left, secures a remote camera as wildlife biologist Miguel Ordenana, right, both of Cooper Ecological Monitoring, surveys the area as they check one of several remote cameras aimed at a possible wildlife corridor in the Cahuenga Pass.  (Al Seib / Los Angeles Times)
Crossing the Hollywood Freeway
Daniel S. Cooper, president of Cooper Ecological Monitoring, crosses the Mulholland Drive Bridge over the 101 Freeway through the Cahuenga Pass. Cooper believes the bridge may have been the route taken by mountain lion P-22, who managed to cross both the 405 and 101 freeways to reach Griffith Park. Cooper Ecological Monitoring places remote cameras on potential wildlife corridors for the Griffith Park Wildlife Connectivity Study to evaluate the movement of mammals through the corridors that may connect Griffith Park to neighboring natural areas. (Al Seib / Los Angeles Times)
Remote cameras
Jeff Sikich, wildlife biologist with the National Park Service, adjusts the infrared trigger used on remote cameras in Griffith Park to monitor possible activity by mountain lion P-22. (Al Seib / Los Angeles Times)
Wildlife tunnel
Daniel S. Cooper, right, president of Cooper Ecological Monitoring, checks a remote camera at Tunnel 6, which goes under the 134 Freeway and is used by equestrians, in Griffith Park. Cooper is monitoring possible access routes of mountain lion P-22, who successfully crossed both the 405 and 101 freeways to reach Griffith Park.  (Al Seib / Los Angeles Times)
Roaming Griffith Park
Jeff Sikich, wildlife biologist with the National Park Service, walks a trail in Griffith Park near the observatory to access remote cameras used to monitor activity by mountain lion P-22, who scientists believe crossed both the 405 and 101 freeways to access one of the largest municipal parks in the country. (Al Seib / Los Angeles Times)
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