After fires razed their homes, wildlife park workers find relief caring for animals
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After fires razed their homes, wildlife park workers find relief caring for animals

After fires razed their homes, wildlife park workers find relief caring for animals

Peter Lang, owner of the Safari West wildlife park, stands on Oct. 18 with a pair of white rhinos in front of a hillside charred by the Tubbs fire that crept to within feet of their enclosure. Lang and 10 of his employees lost their homes in the fire.

 (Genaro Molina / Los Angeles Times)
After fires razed their homes, wildlife park workers find relief caring for animals

Katie Toole feeds acacia to a giraffe at the Safari West game preserve in Sonoma County. Employees who lost their homes to the Tubbs fire have continued to report to work to care for the animals.

 (Genaro Molina / Los Angeles Times)
After fires razed their homes, wildlife park workers find relief caring for animals

Safari West wildlife park owner Peter Lang tours the grounds with his dog Junior.

 (Genaro Molina / Los Angeles Times)
After fires razed their homes, wildlife park workers find relief caring for animals

Lingering smoke from the Tubbs fire hangs over a group of addax, antelope native to the Sahara Desert, at the Safari West park.

 (Genaro Molina / Los Angeles Times)
After fires razed their homes, wildlife park workers find relief caring for animals

A giraffe at the Safari West wildlife preserve.

 (Genaro Molina / Los Angeles Times)
After fires razed their homes, wildlife park workers find relief caring for animals

Ostriches at the Safari West wildlife park.

 (Genaro Molina / Los Angeles Times)
After fires razed their homes, wildlife park workers find relief caring for animals

Peter Lang, owner of Safari West, visits with a white rhino at his wildlife park in Santa Rosa on Oct. 18, 2017.

 (Genaro Molina / Los Angeles Times)
After fires razed their homes, wildlife park workers find relief caring for animals

Giraffes at the Safari West wildlife park.

 (Genaro Molina / Los Angeles Times)
After fires razed their homes, wildlife park workers find relief caring for animals

Employees at the Safari West wildlife park fix a fence damaged during the Tubbs fire.

 (Genaro Molina / Los Angeles Times)
After fires razed their homes, wildlife park workers find relief caring for animals

An Ankole-Watusi bull roams the grounds at Safari West.

 (Genaro Molina / Los Angeles Times)
After fires razed their homes, wildlife park workers find relief caring for animals

Peter Lang, owner of Safari West wildlife park, casts a long shadow on the side of a white rhino, which survived the Tubbs fire with all the other annimals in the reserve.

 (Genaro Molina / Los Angeles Times)
After fires razed their homes, wildlife park workers find relief caring for animals

Safari West wildlife park owner Peter Lang, right, vists with employees in an area damaged by the Tubbs on Oct. 18, 2017. 

 (Genaro Molina / Los Angeles Times)
After fires razed their homes, wildlife park workers find relief caring for animals

Katie Toole feeds acacia to a giraffe at the Safari West preserve in Santa Rosa.

 (Genaro Molina / Los Angeles Times)
After fires razed their homes, wildlife park workers find relief caring for animals

Peter Lang and his dog Junior walk up a road at the Safari West wildlife park.

 (Genaro Molina / Los Angeles Times)
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