Georgia Frontiere
10 Images

Georgia Frontiere | 1927-2008

Georgia Frontiere
Frontiere, pictured in 1981, was vilified by Southern California fans for moving the Rams to St. Louis in 1995. She remained the team’s majority owner and chairwoman for 28 years. (Los Angeles Times)
Georgia Frontiere
Frontiere, at a news conference in the team locker room in 1982, where she explained her position during a players strike, was a rare female owner in the testosterone-laden National Football League. Her Rams played in the Super Bowl three times, winning once, after the 1999 season. (Los Angeles Times)
Georgia Frontiere
“Madame Ram,” as some called her, attends a Valentine’s party with her seventh husband, composer Dominic Frontiere, in 1983. The couple divorced in 1988, though she kept his last name. (Los Angeles Times)
Georgia Frontiere
Frontiere, a former socialite and entertainer, had her theatrical side -- literally, in this case, performing as Amahl’s mother in a 1991 production of the one-act opera “Amahl and the Night Visitors” at Chapman College in Orange. (Glenn Koenig / Los Angeles Times)
Georgia Frontiere
The Orange County years weren’t always kind to Frontiere, talking with quarterback Jim Everett at Anaheim Stadium during the Rams’ game against the Kansas City Chiefs in 1991. Frontiere was booed by fans as she went onto the field. (David Muronaka / Los Angeles Times)
Georgia Frontiere
Frontiere poses with her Rams in 1993, by then long been established in Anaheim. In her early years as owner, Frontiere was close to her players, giving them victory pecks on the cheek and once handing out Cabbage Patch dolls to give to their children for Christmas. By the 1990s, negative media coverage prompted her to shy away from the spotlight. (Los Angeles Times)
Georgia Frontiere
Frontiere at Chapman University in Orange in 1993. By that year the Rams’ attendance in Anaheim had fallen to less than 50,000 a game from a peak of more than 62,000 in 1980, their first season in Orange County. “If [the fans] really care about the team and winning, then they should be there not giving up,” she told The Times that year. “I hate it when they give up.” (Los Angeles Times)
Georgia Frontiere
Frontiere watches her St. Louis team in action during a 31-28 road loss in 1996 to the Arizona Cardinals. The Rams struggled in their first few seasons after moving from Anaheim. (J.D. Cuban / Allsport)
Georgia Frontiere
The Rams’ fortunes would improve dramatically in 1999 in their third season under head coach Dick Vermeil, who joined Frontiere after the team defeated the San Francisco 49ers, 42-20, on Oct. 10 in St. Louis. The Rams would go on to win the Super Bowl. (James A. Finley / Associated Press)
Georgia Frontiere
Coach Dick Vermeil, center, celebrates with quarterback Kurt Warner and Frontiere after the Rams defeated the host Carolina Panthers, 34-21, to clinch the NFC West division title, their first in 14 years, on Dec. 5, 1999. (Chuck Burton / Associated Press)
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