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Thousands of Seattle students walk out of school to protest Trump

Students from Garfield High School march on Monday in Seattle with other young people who walked out of class to protest the election of Donald Trump.
Students from Garfield High School march on Monday in Seattle with other young people who walked out of class to protest the election of Donald Trump.
(Elaine Thompson / Associated Press)

Thousands of middle and high school students across Seattle walked out of classes Monday to protest President-elect Donald Trump.

Teens from public and private schools chanted, “We reject the president-elect,” among other statements as they marched in the streets of the Capitol Hill and downtown neighborhoods. Many waved signs that read “Not My President” or “Love Wins.”

A spokesman with Seattle Public Schools estimated that more than 5,000 students from 20 middle and high schools participated in the walkout. Students who left class will get an “unexcused absence,” spokesman Luke Duecy said.

Some who joined the march said they oppose Trump’s divisive rhetoric and wanted to show support for those he targeted such as Muslims or immigrants.

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Others say they came to support their friends or simply to observe the activities.

High school senior Rose Taylor, who is bisexual and voted for Hillary Clinton, said she worries about what Trump’s election will mean for the LGBT community and others.

“I don’t believe Donald Trump is going to make a good president,” she said. “I’m worried about what’s going to happen to my community and my friends.”

Marci Owens, 17, a transgender high school senior, wasn’t able to vote, but she turned out Monday to show solidarity with others.

“I’m more afraid about the division that it’s created,” said Owens, who is black. “I’m worried about people who are attacking other people. That’s scarier than what Trump has to say.”

Seattle Mayor Ed Murray tweeted his support for the students Monday afternoon, saying he applauds them for taking a stand for inclusiveness. “It’s important their peaceful voices be heard. Let’s look out for each other & be safe,” he said.


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