Bunkers of America
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Inside America’s hidden bunkers

The site of a former nuclear bunker, known as Mount Pony, once held secretly stockpiled billions of dollars in cash that the Federal Reserve planned to use to replenish currency supplies in the wake of Armageddon, in Culpeper, Virginia. In 2007, the facility was converted to the Library of Congress Packard Campus for Audio-Visual Conservation. It now provides underground storage for the Library’s collection of films and audio recordings. 

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This room inside a once-secret Cold War nuclear bunker would have served as the House of Representatives in the event of a nuclear war for members of Congress beneath the Greenbrier, a four-star resort in West Virginia.

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The bomb shelther included decontamination chambers, an intensive care unit (pictured) and a communications briefing room, all surrounded by three to five feet of concrete.

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There were also enough beds and supplies to accomodate all 535 lawmakers, as well as one staffer each inside the 112,544-square-foot facility.

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An incinerator was also inside the shelter to be used for dead lawmakers. 

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A cardboard cut-out of former US President Dwight Eisenhower stands inside the once-secret Cold War nuclear bunker.

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One of two 23-ton blast doors that serve as the primary entrance for the North American Aerospace Defense Command’s (NORAD) facility inside the Cheyenne Mountain Air Force Station in Colorado Springs, Colorado. 

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The secret government complex is built 2000 feet beneath the summit of the mountain, in a bunker that can withstand a 30 megaton nuclear bomb, an electromagnetic pulse and chemical, biological, and radiological attacks. More than 300 people work inside Cheyenne Mountain, which they access via a two-mile long tunnel, and the two 23-ton blast doors. 

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A cramped bathroom is seen in the decommissioned control center of “Quebec-01,” the only Peacekeeper missile launch facility left in the country, near Cheyenne, Wyoming.

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The Peacekeeper could carry up to 12 nuclear warheads, each with a 300-475 kiloton payload. The missile was conceived as a “counterstrike” weapon. 

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Lyle Goodman closes the door on a former US Army munitions bunker, which a developer is repurposing into a doomsday community for civilians, near Edgemont, South Dakota.

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Vivos estimates that its 575 bunkers can hold 5,000 people. 

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Bunker prices start at 25,000 US dollars for a 99-year lease. 

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