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1349 posts
  • On the media
  • Insults

President Trump renewed his attack on e-commerce giant Amazon, saying Wednesday that the company is "doing great damage to tax paying retailers."

The president has been a frequent critic of the company and Chief Executive Jeff Bezos, who also owns the Washington Post.

Many traditional retailers are closing stores and blaming Amazon for a shift to buying goods online. But the company has been hiring thousands of warehouse workers on the spot at job fairs across the country. Amazon has announced a goal of adding 100,000 full-time workers by the middle of next year.

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  • His schedule
  • Domestic policy

President Trump returned to his New Jersey golf club Wednesday after two nights at his home at New York's Trump Tower.

At his golf club, Trump signed into law an updated veterans' education bill that marks the largest expansion of college assistance for military veterans in a decade.

Journalists were not permitted to watch Trump sign the bill, as the White House has done for earlier veterans' legislation he has turned into law. 

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  • Foreign policy
  • North Korea

The latest nuclear crisis with North Korea appeared to ease Tuesday as Pyongyang and Washington sought to lower tension before their increasingly heated threats could spiral into war.

President Trump hailed the de-escalation Wednesday in a tweet.

The question is what happens next in the world’s most dangerous hot spot.

  • Politics and polls

With a strong push from President Trump, Alabama Sen. Luther Strange secured a runoff spot late Tuesday in the Republican primary for his seat.

The senator now faces top vote-getter Roy Moore, the outspoken former chief justice of the Alabama Supreme Court. Moore’s horseback ride to the polls Tuesday demonstrated the political showmanship that has made him a favorite among Alabama voters.

With about four-fifths of precincts reporting results late Tuesday, Moore had 43% of the vote, compared with 31% for Strange. With no candidate achieving the 50% needed to secure the nomination, the Republican runoff is set for Sept. 26.

  • Accolades
  • Politics and polls

John Curtis, the mayor of Provo, Utah, will likely fill the congressional seat vacated by former Rep. Jason Chaffetz.

On Tuesday, Curtis won a three-way Republican primary in the state’s deeply conservative 3rd Congressional District, which spans much of Provo and portions of Salt Lake City.

Curtis, a Mormon, who has served as mayor since 2010, is widely regarded as a moderate. Last year, he did not vote for then-presidential candidate Donald Trump, citing moral concerns about the Republican nominee. Even so, on Wednesday, Trump retweeted a Fox New alert about Curtis’ win, saying “Congratulations John!”

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  • The economy

America’s top business executives may have bristled over President Trump's ban on refugees, his withdrawal from the Paris climate accord and his decision to bar transgender Americans from the military.

But it wasn’t until the embattled president all but defended white supremacists in the aftermath of the deadly clashes over the weekend in Charlottesville, Va., that the country’s corporate elite decided they had had enough.

By Wednesday, so many executives had resigned from Trump’s economic advisory and manufacturing councils, including the heads of General Electric Co., Intel Corp. and Campbell Soup Co., that the president announced on Twitter that he was disbanding the panels.

  • Accolades

President Trump tweeted for the first time about Heather Heyer, the young woman who lost her life over the weekend in Charlottesville, Va.

A memorial service was taking place Wednesday in Charlottesville for Heyer, who was killed Saturday during violent clashes between white nationalists protesting the pending removal of a Confederate statue and counter-demonstrators. Heyer was killed when a driver rammed his car into the counter-protesters.

Trump told reporters Tuesday that he planned to reach out to Heyer's family. The White House did not respond to questions Wednesday about whether Trump had contacted the family.

  • His schedule
  • Politics and polls

President Trump, facing another tough patch in his presidency, will hold his first rally in the West since his inauguration, announcing Wednesday that he will travel to Arizona next week.

The rally could provide a place for Trump to announce a pardon for Joe Arpaio, the former Arizona county sheriff and Trump campaign supporter who was recently convicted of having defied a judge’s order to stop racial profiling of Latinos when he was in office.

Trump told a Fox News contributor this week that he was considering a pardon, which would be broadly controversial but potentially excite some of his core supporters.

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  • Immigration
  • Insults
  • Politics and polls

After President Trump signed an executive order in January and vowed to strip federal funds from "sanctuary" cities, Miami-Dade County Mayor Carlos Gimenez decided to honor federal authorities' requests to hold county prisoners for deportation.

Trump thanked Gimenez in a tweet that contained a video of Atty. Gen. Jeff Sessions speaking Wednesday in Miami, where he denounced Chicago for its defiant “sanctuary city” stance, again blaming the city’s surge in crime on policies designed to protect immigrants.

Although the link between illegal immigration and rising crime is weak — studies show immigrants tend to commit crimes at lower rates than other people — Sessions suggested Miami’s policies contributed to a dramatic drop in homicides.

  • Accolades
  • Politics and polls
  • Fox News

President Trump repeatedly tweeted his support for Alabama Sen. Luther Strange as polls opened Tuesday morning in the Republican primary for Strange's seat.

Strange should have had an easy lock on the seat he took over when Jeff Sessions, the state’s longtime senator, resigned to become the Trump administration’s attorney general.

But the race has become an early test of Trump’s power to persuade his most dedicated supporters.