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Dining at Ca’Brea

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Chef-owner Antonio Tommasi, pictured here, founded Ca’ Brea with Jean-Louis de Mori in 1991. The restaurant closed after a fire last year and was recently reopened, with Tommasi playing a more active role than he had in years. (Ringo H.W. Chiu / For The Times)
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Ca’ Brea’s carpaccio di manzo e Parmigiano — thinly sliced raw beef with arugula, mushrooms, shaved Parmesan and a mustard dressing. (Ringo H.W. Chiu / For The Times)
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At Ca’ Brea, bigoletti — hand-made Venetian-style spaghetti — is served with lobster, clams, shrimp and porcini in a light tomato sauce. (Ringo H.W. Chiu / For The Times)
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Duck breast with Barolo-Morello cherry sauce at Ca’ Brea. (Ringo H.W. Chiu / For The Times)
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Ca’ Brea’s goat cheese wrapped in pancetta, baked and served on a bed of spinach. (Ringo H.W. Chiu / For The Times)
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Melanzane al Grana Padano — eggplant baked with tomato, basil, mozzarella and Parmesan cheese — brings a touch of the south to Ca’ Brea’s menu. (Ringo H.W. Chiu / For The Times)
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Diners at Ca’ Brea, which recently reopened on South La Brea Avenue. (Ringo H.W. Chiu / For The Times)
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