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Museums of the Arroyo Day: A return to L.A.'s past

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Museums of the Arroyo Day gives Angelinos the chance to visit six museums committed to preserving the history and cultural life of the Arroyo Seco – free of charge. The Metro Gold Line deposits guests within walking distance of Heritage Square, Lummis Home and Gardens and the Southwest Museum. Free shuttle service covers the rest with the Los Angeles Police History Museum serving as the shuttle hub.

The Gamble House, designed by Greene and Greene, is one of the premier examples of Arts and Crafts architecture. (Ricardo DeAratanha / Los Angeles Times)
Landmark example
The Gamble House, one of two Pasadena sites participating in Museums of the Arroyo Day, is an example of fine woodwork and art glass windows. (Ricardo DeAratanha / Los Angeles Times)
Circa 1960
The Los Angeles Police Historical Museum, pictured here when it was still a functioning Highland Park police station, is located at 6045 York Blvd. (The Los Angeles Police Historical Society)
In uniform
The Los Angeles Police Historical Museum documents the history of the LAPD through artifacts and photographs, such as this uniform exhibit. (The Los Angeles Police Historical Society.)
In flux
Although renovation efforts are currently underway at the Southwest Museum, the museum will open its doors free of charge on Museums of the Arroyo Day. (Los Angeles Times)
Hand-built
Charles Lummis built this idiosyncratic river rock house along the Arroyo he dubbed “El Alisal.” The Lummis Home also features a botanical garden of California native plants. (Annie Wells / Los Angeles Times)
Pasadena palace
The Fenyes Mansion sits on Orange Grove’s “Millionaire’s Row” and is now home to the Pasadena Museum of History. (Petrea Burchard)
Victoriana
The Hale House is one of eight historic structures that make up Heritage Square, a living history museum of Victorian-era Los Angeles. (Michael Robinson Chavez / Los Angeles Times)
Living history
The sun sets over Heritage Square; the museum features Victorian mansions that have been relocated from various L.A. neighborhoods, from Boyle Heights to Bunker Hill. (Ken J. Johnson / Heritage Square Museum)
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