British Airways Airbus A380
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Comparing airlines’ Airbus A380s

British Airways Airbus A380
British Airways’ Airbus A380 at LAX. The carrier is the 10th airline worldwide to fly the A380 commercially. Its super jumbo jet can accommodate up to 469 passengers in four classes. (British Airways)
Economy class
Economy class

The World Traveler section (economy class) contains 303 seats and spreads across the main and upper cabins. British Airway’s A380 also includes 55 World Traveler Plus (premium economy) seats in the upper level.  (Chris Ratcliffe / Bloomberg)
Business class
Business class

Club World (business class) spreads across the main (44 seats) and upper (53 seats) cabins. Seats can be converted to a 6-foot-long, fully flat bed and feature a retractable privacy screen.  (Chris Ratcliffe / Bloomberg)
First class
First class

British Airways’ 14 first class seats are found in the main cabin. The airline says that passengers in this class have 30% more personal space and 60% more storage space.  (Justin Tallis / AFP/Getty Images)
Thai Airways A380
Thai Airways’ A380 is equipped to seat 507 passengers, 12 in first, 60 in business and 435 in economy.  (Brent Lewin / Bloomberg )
Economy class
Economy class

Economy seats, each 18 inches wide, occupy the entire main cabin as well as the rear of the upper cabin.  (Thai Airways)
Business class
Business class

Seats in business class, each 20 inches wide, have direct aisle access and can recline to a fully flat position. Passengers also have access to a 15-inch viewing screen.  (Thai Airways)
Business class
Business class

The bar in business class.  (Thai Airways)
First class
First class

Each seat in first class is 26.5 inches wide and comes with Wi-Fi access, a 23-inch viewing screen and an in-seat power supply. Passengers have access to larger toilets, and one of the lavatories has a dressing area.  (Thai Airways)
Malaysia Airlines’ Airbus A380
Malaysia Airlines’ A380 seats 494 passengers. Economy and first class seats are located in the main cabin. The upper cabin houses business class and additional economy seats. All seats have a power supply and USB port.  (Chris Ratcliffe / Bloomberg)
Economy class
Economy class

Economy class accommodates 420 passengers. Each seat is 18 inches wide and comes with a 10.6-inch video screen. Seats move forward upon recline (up to six inches).  (Matthew Lloyd / Bloomberg)
Business class
Business class

Business class has 66 seats, which are 72 inches long and recline to a fully flat position. In addition, each passenger has a 17-inch video screen and personal storage space.  (Matthew Lloyd / Bloomberg)
First class
First class

There are eight seats in first class. Each is 40 inches wide, 87 inches long and can recline to a fully flat position. Passengers also have a personal closet and granite cocktail table.  (Matthew Lloyd / Bloomberg)
China Southern Airlines
China Southern, China’s largest carrier, configured its A380 to fit 506 passengers in three classes: eight passengers in first, 70 in business and 428 in economy. The carrier’s A380 ranks third in capacity, behind Lufthansa’s and Air France‘s, whose A380s can accommodate 526 and 538 passengers, respectively.

The Chinese carrier’s superjumbo jet features rear and front staircases, mood lighting and several bars.  (STR / AFP / Getty Images)
China Southern Airlines
Economy

Economy passengers sit in the main cabin (352 seats) and the upper cabin (76 seats). Each enjoys a video monitor and access to in-flight entertainment. (Pascal Pavani / AFP / Getty Images)
China Southern Airlines
Economy

China Southern devotes 85% of its 506 seats to economy class. Only Singapore Airlines has a higher (just slightly higher) percentage of economy seats. On the lower end of the spectrum, economy accounts for 74% of Korean Air’s seats.  (Pascal Pavani / AFP / Getty Images)
China Southern Airlines
Business class

Business-class passengers, who sit at the front of the upper cabin, have access to two bars and seats that recline to flat beds. (C. Brinkmann / Airbus S.A.S.)
China Southern Airlines
First class

First class, located at the front of the main cabin, features eight semi-enclosed suites. Each has a large video monitor, folding table and sliding doors. (C. Brinkmann / Airbus S.A.S. 2011)
Korean Air
Korean Air’s Airbus A380 is configured to seat 407 passengers in three classes, making it the lowest capacity commercial A380. By contrast, Air France can fit up to 538 passengers. Qantas has the second fewest seats with 450. (Jason La / Los Angeles Times)
Korean Air
Economy class

Economy passengers sit in the back of the main cabin. Economy seats (301 in total) span 18 inches wide, are spread 34 inches apart and include a 10.6-inch viewing monitor. Each passenger in this class also has access to coat hangers and a USB port for charging electronic devices. (Gary Friedman / Los Angeles Times)
Korean Air
Business class

Korean Air dedicates the entire upper cabin of its A380 to business class passengers. Each of the 94 seats in this cabin can recline to a fully flat position and has a 15.4-inch video monitor. A screen between seats affords passengers with a degree of privacy. (Gary Friedman / Los Angeles Times)
Korean Air
Business class

Business class features two bars: a self-service bar at the front of the cabin and the hosted Celestial Bar, pictured, at the rear. (Gary Friedman / Los Angeles Times)
Korean Air
First class

Korean Air’s A380 accommodates 12 passengers in first class. Seats are over six and a half feet long and over two feet wide. The viewing monitors in this class are 23-inches, and each passenger has access to a BOSE headset. (Jason La / Los Angeles Times)
Korean Air
First class

The bar in first class is self-service. (Korean Air)
Korean Air
Duty free shop

Korean Air takes an innovative approach to in-flight shopping aboard the A380. Instead of selling goods on pushcarts, the airline set up a shop located in the rear of the main cabin. The flying store features about 60 products, and a cabin crew member is on hand to answer questions. After viewing merchandize, passengers can make purchases at their seat. (Lee Jin-man / Associated Press)
<b>Lufthansa</b>
Lufthansa’s A380 is configured to hold 526 passengers in three classes spread across two levels: 420 in economy, 98 in business and eight in first. Every passenger has a personal viewing screen with access to entertainment and flight information. Lufthansa also installed cameras mounted to the outside of the plane that transmit exterior photos directly to passengers’ monitors, a feature new to the airline. (Lufthansa)
Lufthansa
Economy class

Economy class stretches across the entire main cabin of the plane.  (Christof Stache / AFP / Getty Images)
Lufthansa
Business class

The seats in business class measure almost 20 inches across. (Christof Stache / AFP / Getty Images)
Lufthansa
First Class

Lufthansa designed its first-class cabin to make passengers forget they’re flying. Noise-reducing materials within the cabin walls and sound-absorbing carpeting create what the airline calls “the world’s quietest first-class cabin.” Cabin lighting adjusts according to the time of the day.

Unlike Singapore and Emirates, Lufthansa steered away from enclosed suites in first class. Basing its design on tests and surveys, Lufthansa chose an open layout that places passengers in a communal setting. The airline eliminated overhead storage units to increase headroom, replacing them individual closets. (Lufthansa)
Lufthansa
First class

The lavatory comes with a sizable changing and wash area separate from the lavatory. Passengers in first class receive complimentary cosmetics and toiletries. (Lufthansa)
<b>Air France</b>
Seats for 538 passengers spread across two cabins: 449 passengers in economy class, 80 passengers in business class and nine passengers in first class. (Agence Audiovisuelle Air France)
Air France
Economy class

Seats in economy class, the largest in Air France‘s fleet, spread across the main and upper cabins. The armrests in economy class are also 30% wider than usual. Each passenger has a video screen with a remote control built into the seat in front.  (Agence Audiovisuelle Air France)
Air France
Business class

Passengers in this class have a private storage area, 15-inch video screen, adjustable light and access to two bars. (Agence Audiovisuelle Air France)
Air France
First class

Seats in first class come with a storage area for personal belongings, adjustable light, sizable side table and a pullout tray. Passengers have a bar with magazines and buffet and an exclusive staircase to the plane’s gallery. (Agence Audiovisuelle Air France)
Air France
Changing room

For changing into pajamas or other attire, first class features a private changing room with high-end beauty products. (Agence Audiovisuelle Air France)
Air France
Gallery

Air France innovates aboard its A380 with a gallery showcasing exhibits from major museums around the world. The exhibits, created exclusively for Air France, display on three large video screens. The gallery is open to first- and business-class passengers, and Air France plans to change its exhibits regularly.  (Agence Audiovisuelle Air France)
Emirates
Emirates’ superjumbo jets are built to accommodate 489 passengers in three classes: 14 in first, 76 in business and 399 in economy. (Emirates)
Emirates
Economy class

Similar to Singapore and Qantas, Emirates economy seats have a 10.6-inch monitor and personal power supply. (Emirates Airline)
Emirates
Business class

Business class passengers have access to a privacy divider, massage function, 17-inch viewing monitor and personal mini-bar. The seats recline into beds up to 79 inches long. Business class also features a lounge with an attendant. (Emirates)
Emirates Airline
First class

Enclosed suites afford passengers in first class a high degree of privacy. The suites feature sliding doors, a personal mini-bar, wardrobe and a 23-inch wide viewing monitor. The seats recline to form a fully flat bed. A divider that separates adjoining suites can be lowered for passengers traveling together. Like business passengers, first-class fliers have access to an exclusive lounge. (Emirates)
Emirates
Shower spa

Emirates’ superjumbo jets come with two shower spas in first class, a new feature to the A380. (Emirates)
<b>Qantas Airways</b>
Qantas’ A380s are configured to carry 450 passengers in four classes: 14 in first, 72 in business, 32 in premium economy and 332 in economy. (Ken Hively / Los Angeles Times)
Qantas Airways
Economy class

Similar to Singapore Airlines, Qantas economy seats have a 10.6-inch monitor and personal power supply. (Myung J. Chun / Los Angeles Times)
Qantas Airways
Premium economy

Seats in premium economy are 19.5-inches wide and recline to provide footrests that provide additional legroom. Each seat has an adjustable viewing monitor built into to the armrest. (Sergio Dionisio / Getty Images)
Qantas Airways
Business class

Seats in business class recline to form fully flat beds up to 80-inches long. Seats also come with a built-in massage function, foldout table and 12.1-inch viewing monitor built into the armrest. Passengers in business class have access to a lounge for relaxing with other passengers or meetings. (Ken Hively / Los Angeles Times)
Qantas Airways
First class

Unlike Singapore Airlines, the cabins in Qantas’s A380s are not fully enclosed, though privacy can be maintained with adjustable window shades. The seats in each cabin convert to fully flat beds 83.5-inches long and 29 inches wide. Each cabin has a 17-inch wide-screen monitor, storage unit and fold-out table. (Ken Hively / Los Angeles Times)
Singapore Airlines
Singapore designed its A380 to carry 471 passengers in three classes: 12 in first, 60 in business and 399 in economy. (Pascal Parrot / Getty Images)
Singapore Airlines
Economy class

Each seat in economy comes with a personal 10.6-inch viewing monitor and personal power supply. (Singapore Airlines)
Singapore Airlines
Business class

The leather seats in business class recline to fully flat beds with linens, a duvet and large pillows. Each seat comes with a business unit that performs many of the functions of a laptop. (Singapore Airlines)
Singapore Airlines
First class

On Singapore’s A380, first class means enclosed cabins with fully flat beds separate from the seat. Each cabin has a dining area big enough for two, a large 23-inch LCD monitor and a full-sized wardrobe. Passengers can expect high levels of privacy, as each cabin comes with blinds and sliding doors. (Singapore Airlines)
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