Richard Phillips
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PHOTOS: Somali pirates

Richard Phillips
Capt. Richard Phillips smiles after arriving on a plane in South Burlington, Vt., Friday, April 17, 2009. Phillips is back in his home state, a week and a half after being taken hostage by pirates and then being rescued by Navy snipers. At rear is Phillips ' daughter, Mariah. (Toby Talbot / Associated Press)
Reunion
Capt. Richard Phillips, left, arrives on a plane in South Burlington, Vt., Friday, April 17, 2009. He is greeted by his wife, Andrea, center, and daughter, Mariah, right. (Toby Talbot / Associated Press)
Captain
Maersk Alabama captain Richard Phillips, center, arrives at Moi International airport Mombasa, Kenya, Friday for the flight home.  (Sayyid Azim / Associated Press)
Crew
Members of the crew of the Maersk Alabama walk on the tarmac with their families as they debark a plane April 16, 2009 at Andrews Air Force Base in Maryland.  (Win McNamee / Getty Images)
Crew plane
Members of the crew of the Maersk Alabama wave as they debark their plane at Andrews Air Force Base in Maryland.  (Win McNamee / Getty Images)
Life boat
The guided-missile destroyer USS Bainbridge tows the lifeboat from the Maersk Alabama to the amphibious assault ship USS Boxer (in background) to be processed for evidence after the rescue of Capt. Robert Phillips April 13, 2009 in the Indian Ocean.  (Megan E. Sindelar/U.S. Navy)
The Somalia rescue lifeboat
A team from the U.S. amphibious assault ship Boxer in the Indian Ocean tows the orange lifeboat that held American cargo ship captain Richard Phillips and his Somali captors. The vessel was brought to the Boxer for processing of evidence. (Jon Rasmussen / U.S. Navy)
Press
Andrea Phillips, wife of sea Capt. Richard Phillips, leaves a press conference a day after Phillips was rescued by U.S. Navy SEALS from pirates near the coast of Somalia April 13, 2009 in Burlington, Vermont.  (Mario Tama/Getty Images)
Rescued
Richard Phillips, captain of the Maersk Alabama, right, with Frank Castellano, commanding officer of USS Bainbridge, after being rescued by U.S Naval Forces off the coast of Somalia, on Sunday, April 12, 2009.  (U.S. Navy)
Maersk Alabama
The 17,000-ton, Danish-owned Maersk Alabama, the first US vessel to be hijacked by Somali pirates, docked at Mombasa port of Kenya, 11 April 2009 with the 19 American crew-members who were able to overpower the pirates and regain control of their ship. (Sarah Elliott / EPA)
Maersk Alabama crew
After receiving news that their captain was free, crew members of the Maersk Alabama celebrated on deck. The ship had reached its port destination of Mombasa, Kenya. (Sayyid Axim / Associated Press)
Ship
A U.S. Navy handout photograph released on 13 April 2009 shows an image taken by the Scan Eagle UAV and a Navy P-3C Orion of the Danish-owned ship Maersk Alabama during the hostage situation in the Indian Ocean on 09 April 2009.  (U.S. Navy)
Life boat
This image provided by the U.S. Navy taken from video made with an unmanned aerial vehicle, shows a 28-foot lifeboat from the U.S.-flagged container ship Maersk Alabama on Thursday, April 9, 2009 in the Indian Ocean.  (U.S. Navy)
Bow Asir
Crew members of the Norwegian-registered Bow Asir stand on deck after they arrived in the port of Mombasa.The owner of the Norwegian tanker says it has been released by pirates, two weeks after it was seized off the Somali coast, and all 27 of its crew members are unhurt.The 23,000-ton Bow Asir was captured 250 miles off the Somali coast March 26 when 16 to 18 pirates carrying machine guns boarded it and took control. (Karel Prinsloo / Associated Press)
MT Stolt Strength
Wives of Filipino sailors, Doris Deseo, left, and Catherine Boretta, right, show pictures of their husbands Carlo, second from left, and Rodell, second from right, to the Associated Press as they visit the office of a shipping agency in Manila, Philippines, to get updates on negotiations to free their hostage husbands in Somalia. “The families of hostages are afraid of any rescue attempt because it might put the lives of the hostages in danger,” said Boretta, whose husband Rodell has been held captive by Somali pirates on the MT Stolt Strength for nearly five months. (Aaron Favila / Associated Press)
Sailboat held hostage by pirates
Suspected pirates, at left, are seen after they were intercepted by marine commandos of the French Navy in the Gulf of Aden, off the coast of Somalia. French navy commandos stormed a French sailboat held by pirates off the Somali coast in an assault triggered by threats the passengers would be executed. One hostage was killed in the operation. (Associated Press)
French yacht Tanit
Armed pirates and their hostages are seen aboard the French yacht Tanit off the coast of Somalia. (Associated Press)
Sailboat Tanit retaken by French forces
French naval personnel negotiate with Somali pirates holding the yacht Tanit. In a later operation to free the captives, a hostage and two of the captors were killed. (French Navy / EPA)
‘Pirate scarecrows’ hopes to deter Somali pirates
A vessel docked in Mombasa, Kenya, has a “pirate scarecrow” prominently displayed on the top deck. These scarecrows have recently begun to appear on vessels in the past couple of months in hopes of detering Somali pirates. (Sarah Elliott / EPA)
Four suspected Somali pirates
Four suspected Somali pirates are held in a Kenyan police station at the port of Mombasa. Seven suspected Somali pirates were picked up on March 29 by Greek and Spanish forces who then handed them over to a German frigate. The seven are accused of firing on the German oil tanker, FGS Spessart, off the coast of Yemen. (Stringer AFP/Getty Images)
German Military Police escort one of the seven suspected Somali pirates
German Military Police escort one of the seven suspected Somali pirates to the Port Police station in Mombasa, Kenya. (Stringer / EPA)
A Danish navy sailor stands guard as confiscated weapons from Somali suspected pirates go on display
A Danish navy sailor stands guard at a display of confiscated weapons from suspected Somali pirates onboard the HDMS Absalon (L 16) as it sails in the Gulf of Aden. (Mazen Mahdi / EPA)
Kenyan police officers escort suspected pirates
Kenyan police officers escort suspected pirates at the port in Mombassa, Kenya, after they were handed over by members of the German navy. (Associated Press)
Hamburg district court issues arrest warrants for Somali pirates
A boat of the German navy (Bundesmarine) stops a boat with suspected pirates in the Gulf of Aden off Somalia’s coast. A Hamburg district court issued arrest warrants for the nine Somali pirates who were taken into custody by members of the crew of the frigate Rheinland-Pfalz. (Bundeswehr / Piz Djibouti / Handout, EPA)
South Korean captain meets family
Seo Byung-soo, right, the South Korean captain of the Japanese owned-Panama registered MV Chemstar Venus that was seized by armed Somali gunmen on November 15, 2008 in the Gulf of Aden, is greeted by his family members at Incheon International Airport. All 23 crew members of the Japanese-owned ship were released on February 13, 2009. (Lee Jin-man AFP/Getty Images)
Turkish navy ship Giresun
Members of the special force of Turkish navy ship Giresun perform during a farewell ceremony in Aksaz Navy Base near the coastal town of Marmaris. The Turkish frigate set sail to join an international coalition against Somali pirates in the Gulf of Aden, the Anatolia news agency reported. (Kenan Gurbuz AFP/Getty Images)
MV Faina
Port workers look on as a military vehicle is unloaded from the MV Faina and loaded onto a rail wagon at the port of Mombasa, Kenya. Somali pirates seized the Faina, laden with several dozen tanks and other heavy weapons, off the Horn of Africa on Sept. 25, 2008. The ship and crew were released in February 2009 after pirates sped off in skiffs with a 3.2 million dollar ransom that had been dropped to the ship’s deck by parachute. (Stringer / Associated Press)
Crew members of the Ukranian ship MV Faina
Crew members of the Ukranian ship MV Faina, in khaki camouflage, are welcomed by their family members after arriving at the Kiev’s Boryspil International Airport. (Efrem Lukatsky / Associated Press)
U.S. Navy Assists The Crew Of The Motor Vessel Faina
U.S. Navy Hospital Corpsman 2nd Class Patrick Satterfield, assigned to the guided-missile destroyer USS Mason (DDG 87), checks the blood pressure of a crew member aboard Motor Vessel Faina in the Indian Ocean. Somali pirates released Faina February 5, after holding the ship hostage for more than four months off the Somali coast. (U.S. Navy, Getty Images)
Crew members of the MV Faina
Crew members of the MV Faina leave the vessel after the ship docked at Mombasa, Kenya. (Sayyid Azim / Associated Press)
U.S. Navy Assists The Crew Of The Motor Vessel Faina
U.S. Navy Lt. J.G. Jonathan Hulecki, assigned to the guided-missile destroyer USS Mason (DDG 87), assists the crew members of Motor Vessel Faina by carrying food and supplies. Somali pirates released the Faina after holding the ship hostage for more than four months off the Somali coast. (U.S. Navy / Getty Images)
Motor Vessel Faina
Sailors from the Norfolk-based destroyer USS Mason climb aboard Motor Vessel Faina to conduct a health and comfort inspection of the crew as well as provide them with food, water and medical support. (MC1 Michael R. McCormick / Associated Press)
USNS Catawba
U.S. Navy fleet ocean tug USNS Catawba provides fuel and fresh water to Motor Vessel Faina following its release by Somali pirates. (MC1 Michael R. McCormick / Associated Press)
Greek vessel Centauri
Three Filipino crew members of the Greek vessel Centauri pray after the ship docked at the port of Mombasa, Kenya. The ship was held by Somali pirates for more than two months and released Nov. 27, 2008, with all 25 Filipino crew unharmed. (Stringer / Associated Press)
Somalis arrested
Somalis arrested during an attempted hijacking of a ship wait at a police station in Mombasa, Kenya. The suspected pirates were arrested, and three others killed, by sailors of HMS Cumberland, as they attempted to hijack a cargo ship off the Horn of Africa. (Associated Press)
Pirates hold fishing vessel
Suspected pirates hold the crew of a Chinese fishing vessel hostage as the ship passes through the Indian Ocean. (Jason R. Zalasky/ / U.S. Navy / Getty Images)
Pirates
Somali pirates in small boats are seen alongside the hijacked ship Faina. Armed pirates aboard fast-moving skiffs have increasingly turned the shipping lanes off Somalia into a lucrative hunting grounds. (U.S. Navy)
Faina
The Faina, a pirated cargo vessel, is kept under observation by the U.S. guided-missile cruiser Vella Gulf off the coast of Somalia. (Petty Officer 2nd Class Jason R. Zalasky / U.S. Navy)
Watching
The commanding officer of a U.S. Navy guided-missile cruiser monitors the pirated Ukrainian cargo ship Faina off the coast of Somalia while one of the cruiser’s helicopters provides surveillance. (Petty Officer 2nd Class Jason R. Zalasky / U.S. Navy)
Boat
Pirates leave the Ukrainian merchant vessel Faina for Somalia’s shore while under observation by a U.S. Navy ship. (Petty Officer 2nd Class Jason R. Zalasky / U.S. Navy)
Crew
Somali pirates holding the merchant vessel Faina stand with some of their hostages after a U.S. Navy request to check on the welfare of the crew of the ship held off the coast of Somalia. (Petty Officer 2nd Class Jason R. Zalasky / U.S. Navy)
Faina bow
Somali pirates holding the merchant vessel Faina stand on the deck of the ship after a U.S. Navy request to check on the health and welfare of the ship’s crew in the Indian Ocean off the coast of Somalia. (Petty Officer 2nd Class Jason R. Zalasky / U.S. Navy)
pirates
Special force members from Malaysia Maritime Police conduct an anti-piracy drill near an island in Sabab, Malaysia. (Associated Press)
PiratesNavy provides assistance to recently pirated vessel off Somali Coast.
U.S. sailors aboard the merchant vessel Al Marjan. The ship had been under the control of Somalia-based pirates since Oct. 17, 2007. (Ensign Elizabeth Tree / Navy Visual News Service)
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