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'Saturday Night Live' and 'Westworld' are tied with the most nods. Who will come out on top?

Leslie Jones, left, and Kate McKinnon both nabbed Emmy nominations for "Saturday Night Live" Thursday morning, two of 22 total for the series. (Brian van der Brug / Los Angeles Times)
Leslie Jones, left, and Kate McKinnon both nabbed Emmy nominations for "Saturday Night Live" Thursday morning, two of 22 total for the series. (Brian van der Brug / Los Angeles Times)

NBC's long-running sketch comedy "Saturday Night Live" and HBO's futuristic robot drama "Westworld" started the Emmy race tied as the nominations leaders with 22 apiece.

At last weekend's Creative Arts Emmys, where many of the technical awards and guest acting prizes were handed out -- categories in which both triumphed -- the shows remained tied in the lead with five each. 

At the outset, "Westworld" had better odds simply because "SNL" has multiple actors in the same categories, e.g. Leslie Jones, Vanessa Bayer and Kate McKinnon all vying for supporting actress in a comedy.

But, even with the intra-show competition factor, and "Westworld" boasting an edge mathematically with a larger number of categories left to win, it could still be a horse race. 

Anthony Hopkins, left, and Jeffrey Wright are both nominated for Emmys for their roles in HBO's "Westworld." (AP/HBO)
Anthony Hopkins, left, and Jeffrey Wright are both nominated for Emmys for their roles in HBO's "Westworld." (AP/HBO)

"Saturday Night Live" can win five trophies on Sunday: supporting actress and actor in a comedy (Alec Baldwin), directing and writing for a variety series and variety sketch series. If they sweep those -- which is possible given the surge this season experienced -- the show's total haul will be 10. (Don't get us started on why, if the show competes in the variety sketch categories, the actors are nominated in the comedy categories.)

By contrast, if "Westworld" were to sweep the remaining seven categories in which it is competing -- drama series, actor and actress, supporting actor and actress, writing and directing -- it would end up with 12. Yet, if smart money is elsewhere in several of those races, the shows could end up tying, yet again, as the night's overall winners.  

Given how Baldwin, McKinnon and guest actress winner Melissa McCarthy enlivened the show -- and interests in -- with their impressions of President Trump, Atty. Gen. Jeff Sessions (among others) and former White House Press Secretary Sean Spicer, respectively, we're guessing "SNL" emerges victorious in the head-to-head battle.

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