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The Emmy Awards have wrapped. "Big Little Lies" was a big winner along with Donald Glover, "Saturday Night Live" and "The Handmaid's Tale." Lena Waithe made history as the first black woman to win for writing in a comedy series, "Handmaid's" was the first streaming show to win drama, and Donald Glover was the first black man to win directing in comedy. Check out our behind-the-scenes stories, fashion breakdowns and red carpet interviews.

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Women still a dramatic minority in Emmys' writing and directing categories

Lesli Linka Glatter is a seven-time Emmy nominee. Five of those nods have been for directing. (Jennifer S. Altman / For The Times)
Lesli Linka Glatter is a seven-time Emmy nominee. Five of those nods have been for directing. (Jennifer S. Altman / For The Times)

With separate categories for actors and actresses, male and female performers are equally represented among 2017's Emmy nominees, but take a short hop over to the directing and writing categories and the awards are primarily a boys club. 

Among the 114 writers nominated this year for drama series, comedy series, variety series and limited series, movie or dramatic special, only 21 are women. That's a hair over 18%.

Women are best represented when they're writing for a variety series: Of the 90 people named from the staffs of "Full Frontal With Samantha Bee," "Last Week Tonight With John Oliver," "Late Night With Seth Meyers," "The Late Show With Stephen Colbert" and "Saturday Night Live," 21 writers — 23.3% — are female. 

The four directing categories to be honored Sunday night are even less encouraging for women: There are only three women among the 25 directors nominated for drama series, comedy series, variety series, and limited series, movie, or dramatic special

Adding to that, all three female directors  — five-time nominee Leslie Linka Glatter ("Homeland")  and Emmy newbies Kate Dennis and Reed Morano (both up for "The Handmaid's Tale") — are competing in the same category, directing for a drama series.

Morano was the lone woman nominated for cinematography for a single-camera series (half-hour), for "Divorce"; that award went to David Miller for "Veep."

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