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A look at Hurricane Irma by the numbers

Hurricane Irma made landfall in the Florida Keys as a Category 4 hurricane on Sunday, slamming into the state and moving inland. On Monday, Irma took out power for about 7 million people before being downgraded to a tropical depression.

Even so, the storm continues to assert its presence, with 2 to 5 inches of rain — and as much as 8 inches in isolated pockets — expected through Wednesday across South Carolina and northern Georgia, Alabama and Mississippi into Tennessee and North Carolina.

Here’s some of what we know by the numbers.

185 mph

Irma’s peak wind speed, making it the most powerful hurricane ever recorded in the open Atlantic.

142 mph

The speed of gusts near the storm’s eye in Naples. Tropical-storm-strength winds were churning as far as 220 miles away from Irma’s center.

Weather reporters jump and cling on to illustrate the force of Hurricane Irma's winds as it arrives Sept. 10 in Miami.
Weather reporters jump and cling on to illustrate the force of Hurricane Irma's winds as it arrives Sept. 10 in Miami. (Marcus Yam / Los Angeles Times)

6.4 million

People told to flee in Florida in advance of the storm, leading to days of jampacked highways and frantic searches for gasoline amid one of the nation’s largest ever emergency evacuations. In total, nearly 7 million people in the Southeast were told to shelter or evacuate.

37

Reported fatalities in the Caribbean, as of Monday afternoon. Such tolls are difficult to determine because it is sometimes impossible to tell whether a death was the direct result of a storm.

More than 200,000

Number of Floridians still in shelters as of Monday afternoon.

Hundreds of people gather Sept. 8 in an emergency shelter at the Miami-Dade County Fair Expo Center ahead of Hurricane Irma.
Hundreds of people gather Sept. 8 in an emergency shelter at the Miami-Dade County Fair Expo Center ahead of Hurricane Irma. (Saul Loeb / AFP/Getty Images)

Live updates on the continuing threat of Irma and its aftermath »

Nearly 7.2 million

The number of homes and businesses that were without power in multiple states, as of midday Monday. More than 6.5 million were in Florida.

In Bonita Springs, Fla., floodwaters reached waist deep in some areas, flooding homes and cars.
In Bonita Springs, Fla., floodwaters reached waist deep in some areas, flooding homes and cars. (Carolyn Cole / Los Angeles Times)

10 to 12 feet

The height of the storm surges expected in the Naples-Fort Myers area. A 10-foot storm surge at sea level can submerge the first floor of a building in minutes. Hurricane Katrina in 2005 was only a Category 3 storm, but it was immense in size. With a storm surge of 28 feet, combined with a broken levee, the city of New Orleans was quickly underwater. About 1,800 people lost their lives in the storm — the majority from drowning.

With his Fort Myers, Fla., neighborhood flooded, Cesar De La Cruz makes breakfast Sept. 12 on a propane stove in his driveway.
With his Fort Myers, Fla., neighborhood flooded, Cesar De La Cruz makes breakfast Sept. 12 on a propane stove in his driveway. (David Goldman / Associated Press)

2

The number of Category 4 hurricanes that have made landfall in the United States in the last two weeks. The U.S. mainland has never before endured two Category 4 hurricanes in the span of a year

Water from Addicks Reservoir flows into Houston neighborhoods Aug. 29 as floodwaters from Tropical Storm Harvey rise.
Water from Addicks Reservoir flows into Houston neighborhoods Aug. 29 as floodwaters from Tropical Storm Harvey rise. (David J. Phillip / Associated Press)

2.4 million

The numbers of meals FEMA transferred at Florida’s request. The federal emergency agency also provided 1.4 million liters of water.

95%

The initial estimate of properties on the island of Barbuda that were damaged or destroyed. Later, Gaston Browne, the prime minister of Antigua and Barbuda, said the losses were probably even worse. About 1,600 Barbuda residents were evacuated to Antigua.

Damage in Barbuda on Sept. 7, after Hurricane Irma.
Damage in Barbuda on Sept. 7, after Hurricane Irma. (Anika E. Kentish / Associated Press)
The devastation of the island of Jost Van Dyke in the British Virgin Islands on Sept. 11 after Hurricane Irma.
The devastation of the island of Jost Van Dyke in the British Virgin Islands on Sept. 11 after Hurricane Irma. (Capt. George Eatwell / British Ministry of Defense)

20 feet

The size of the waves that pounded Havana.

96 years

Since the Tampa Bay area was in the bull’s-eye of a major hurricane. The so-called Tarpon Springs Hurricane struck the Tampa Bay-St. Petersburg area on Oct. 25, 1921, as a powerful Category 3 storm. A storm surge estimated at 11 feet destroyed substantial portions of the sea wall and inundated several areas.

5

The number of times Florida’s Disney World has had to close since the resort opened in 1971. All major attractions were closed Sunday and Monday as the storm worked its way up the length of the state.

51

The number of cruises that were canceled, shortened or revised due to Hurricane Irma, according to Cruise Critic.

1

Tropical storm warnings in Atlanta. Monday’s warning was a first for Georgia’s largest city.

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