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With Ian Crozier's reveal, here are the 10 Ebola patients treated in U.S.

Ten Ebola patients have been treated in the U.S. Eight have recovered; two have died. Here's who they are

Since the current Ebola outbreak began a year ago in West Africa — where the World Health Organization estimates the virus has claimed more than 6,000 lives — 10 patients have been treated in the United States. Of those 10, eight have recovered and two have died. The U.S. patients and their ages at diagnosis:

Dr. Kent Brantly, 33, an American physician, was treating Ebola patients through missionary work in Liberia when he contracted the virus. He was flown to Emory University Hospital in Atlanta for treatment, arriving Aug. 2. Brantly became the first patient to be treated for Ebola in the United States. In the course of his treatment, he received a blood transfusion from a 14-year-old boy who had survived the disease, as well as the experimental drug ZMapp. Brantly recovered and was released from the hospital Aug. 21. He has donated blood to several other patients in an effort to help them.

Nancy Writebol, 59, an American nurse who contracted Ebola while doing missionary work in Liberia, arrived at Emory on Aug. 5. Like Brantly, she received the experimental drug ZMapp, temporarily exhausting its supply. Writebol recovered and was released from the hospital Aug. 19.

Dr. Rick Sacra, 51, an American aid worker, contracted Ebola while in Liberia. He arrived at Nebraska Medical Center in Omaha for treatment on Sept. 5. Sacra received a blood plasma transfusion from Brantly and the experimental drug TKM-Ebola. Sacra recovered and was released from the medical center Sept. 25.

Dr. Ian Crozier, 43, an American physician working with the World Health Organization, contracted the virus while treating Ebola patients in Sierra Leone. He began feeling sick Sept. 6, so he isolated himself; a blood test came back positive for Ebola the next day. He arrived at Emory on Sept. 9 and stayed there for 40 days — the longest of any U.S. Ebola patient. Crozier recovered and was released from the hospital Oct. 19. His identity was kept secret until Sunday.

Thomas Eric Duncan, 42, was the first person diagnosed with Ebola on U.S. soil. The Liberian national arrived in Dallas on Sept. 20 from Liberia and went to the Texas Health Presbyterian Hospital emergency room Sept. 25, complaining of a headache, fever and abdominal pain. He was sent home with a prescription for antibiotics but was not recognized as a possible Ebola patient. On Sept. 28, Duncan was rushed back to the hospital by ambulance and placed in isolation. His treatment included brincidofovir, an experimental broad-spectrum antiviral drug. Duncan died at the hospital Oct. 8.

Ashoka Mukpo, 33, was working in Liberia as a cameraman for NBC and other news outlets when he was diagnosed with Ebola in early October. Mukpo, an American, was flown to Nebraska Medical Center in Omaha, arriving Oct. 6. His treatment included a blood plasma transfusion from Brantly and brincidofovir, the same drug Duncan received. Mukpo recovered and was released from the medical center Oct. 22.

Nina Pham, 26, an American nurse who treated Duncan at Texas Health Presbyterian Hospital, reported a fever Oct. 10 and was put into isolation at the Dallas hospital. Two days later, she was diagnosed with Ebola. Pham was transferred to a National Institutes of Health clinic in Bethesda, Md., on Oct. 16 for further treatment. She recovered and was released from the clinic Oct. 24.

Amber Vinson, 29,  another American nurse who treated Duncan at Texas Health Presbyterian Hospital, reported a slight fever Oct. 13 and entered isolation at the Dallas hospital the next day. On Oct. 15, she was diagnosed with Ebola and transferred to Emory University Hospital for further treatment. She recovered and was released from the hospital Oct. 28.

Dr. Craig Spencer, 33, an American physician, was exposed to Ebola while working in Guinea with the aid group Doctors Without Borders and fell ill a few days after returning home to New York City. He reported having a fever Oct. 23 and was rushed by ambulance to Bellevue Hospital Center in Manhattan, where he was isolated and treated. He recovered and was released from the hospital Nov. 11.

Dr. Martin Salia, 44, contracted Ebola while treating patients in Sierra Leone, where he was a citizen. Salia, whose American wife and children live in the U.S., arrived at Nebraska Medical Center on Nov. 15 in what doctors called extremely critical condition. His treatment included kidney dialysis, the experimental drug ZMapp and a blood plasma transfusion from an unidentified Ebola survivor. He died Nov. 17.

For news about Ebola and much more, follow @raablauren and @kurtisalee on Twitter.

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