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298 posts
  • Governor's race
  • 2018 election
  • California Republicans
A convention delegate tries to suspend the rules for a revote between candidates Travis Allen, standing left, and John Cox, center.
A convention delegate tries to suspend the rules for a revote between candidates Travis Allen, standing left, and John Cox, center. (Kent Nishimura / Los Angeles Times)

The California Republican Party declined to offer an endorsement Sunday in the governor’s race, a move that could hurt the chances for GOP voters to coalesce behind a candidate before the June 5 primary election.

Businessman John Cox received 55.3% of the vote, short of the 60% required for the party nod. Assemblyman Travis Allen of Huntington Beach received 40.5%, and 4.1% voted for no endorsement at the party’s convention in San Diego.

With Republicans split between the two candidates, the GOP faces the prospect of failing to advance a candidate to the general election. Failing to launch a GOP candidate to the top of the ticket could also dampen voter turnout in critical congressional races that are key to the party’s effort to hold on to control of the U.S. House of Representatives.

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  • 2018 election
  • California Republicans
  • California Democrats
Sen. Joni Ernst (R-Iowa) speaks at the California Republican Party convention on May 5.
Sen. Joni Ernst (R-Iowa) speaks at the California Republican Party convention on May 5. (Kent Nishimura / Los Angeles Times)

Iowa Sen. Joni Ernst took a jab at California politicians, notably Los Angeles Mayor Eric Garcetti, as she addressed the state GOP convention on Saturday night.

“It’s odd that I’m coming out to California from Iowa, because what we’ve seen recently is a lot of folks from California coming to Iowa,” she told several hundred delegates and guests gathered in San Diego.

Ernst noted that House Minority Leader Nancy Pelosi of San Francisco would be fundraising with Iowa Democrats on Sunday, and that Garcetti recently visited the state as he ponders launching a presidential bid.

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  • Governor's race
  • 2018 election
  • California Republicans
Travis Allen addresses delegates at the California Republican Party convention.
Travis Allen addresses delegates at the California Republican Party convention. (Kent Nishimura / Los Angeles Times)

Tension has been mounting between the GOP candidates for California governor, but on Saturday the pair largely refrained from criticizing each other as they made their pitches to hundreds of delegates at the state Republican Party convention.

As they spoke at a candidate forum, an attack on a fellow Republican would have led to an airhorn shriek and an immediate end to their speeches. So John Cox and Travis Allen slashed at the Democrats who rule California as they made their cases as to why GOP voters should unify behind their candidacies.

Allen, an assemblyman from Huntington Beach, did his best to hype up the crowd by immediately ripping into the state’s Democratic leaders for California’s deteriorating public schools, increased poverty and homelessness and crumbling roads.

California Republicans gathering in San Diego for this weekend’s state GOP convention find themselves in a familiar spot: scrambling for ways to resurrect a party sliding toward political irrelevance in this solidly Democratic state.

(Gina Ferazzi / Los Angeles Times)

Minority Leader Nancy Pelosi on Saturday called for an ethics investigation into San Fernando Valley Democratic Rep. Tony Cárdenas, who this week acknowledged that he is the unnamed defendant in a Jane Doe lawsuit alleging he molested a 16-year-old girl. 

Cárdenas has vehemently denied the allegations, and contacted fellow members of Congress in recent days to assert his innocence in connection with the lawsuit.

In a statement Saturday, Pelosi said Cárdenas “appropriately asked us to withhold judgement until there is a full investigation of the facts.” 

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Patrick Little, right, is questioned by officials after being escorted out of the California GOP convention in San Diego on Saturday.
Patrick Little, right, is questioned by officials after being escorted out of the California GOP convention in San Diego on Saturday.

An anti-Semitic GOP Senate candidate was kicked out of the California Republican Party’s convention in San Diego on Saturday morning, with one witness saying he was dragging and kicking an Israeli flag while being escorted out.

Party officials said that, from the outset of the convention the candidate, Patrick Little, was not welcome at the gathering.

“There's no room for that kind of hate speech that that man uses," said Cynthia Bryant, executive director of the California Republican Party.

  • Congressional races
  • 2018 election
  • California Republicans
(Christine Mai-Duc / Los Angeles Times)

Rep. Mimi Walters painted a dire picture for her fellow California Republicans on Friday night. Headlining a congressional dinner at the state party’s annual confab, Walters warned that Democrats are targeting Republicans “and nowhere harder than right here in California.”

Walters, who is facing a competitive race with four Democratic challengers, acknowledged that winning crucial House seats this year will be tough. Democrats are going after 10 GOP-held House seats in California, seven of which were won by Hillary Clinton in 2016.

“The Democrats think there’s no stopping them this time. They’re not just coming for any one of us, they’re coming for all of us.” But, she added, “this isn’t going to go the way they think it is.”

Two years ago, U.S. Rep. Tony Cárdenas ran away with his reelection contest, defeating his challenger by nearly 50 percentage points in his San Fernando Valley district.

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President Trump signs an executive order on immigration.
President Trump signs an executive order on immigration. (Susan Walsh / Associated Press)

California Atty. Gen. Xavier Becerra said he will file a motion today seeking to dismiss a lawsuit filed by the Trump administration that would block California’s so-called sanctuary state laws aimed at protecting immigrants in the country illegally.

A lawsuit filed in March by federal officials argued that three laws passed by the California Legislature last year improperly obstruct federal immigration law and therefore violate the Constitution's supremacy clause, which gives federal law precedence over state law.

The state laws prohibit local law enforcement from alerting immigration agents when detainees are released from custody, bar business owners from voluntarily helping federal agents find and detain undocumented workers, and create a state inspection program for federal immigration detention centers.

  • California Legislature
Cell tower interceptors, often called "stingrays" or "dirtboxes," mimic traditional cell towers.
Cell tower interceptors, often called "stingrays" or "dirtboxes," mimic traditional cell towers. (Jeff Roberson / Associated Press)

A coalition of civil rights and immigrant advocacy groups has penned a letter in support of a state bill that would force California police and sheriff agencies to disclose all of their surveillance gear, as Oakland this week approved similar requirements through what may be the strongest city surveillance ordinance in the country.

Supporters say they believe the legislation will propel other cities and counties across the state to follow the lead, ensuring law enforcement officials are not obtaining powerful public safety tools behind closed doors.

For years, privacy advocates in Oakland have pushed back against the ways that law enforcement, through new technology and shared databases, collects the personal information of criminal suspects and innocent bystanders alike. Under the city’s latest ordinance, police will have to report all of their surveillance technology, keep more public data on its use and obtain community input before buying new equipment. The new rule also includes protections for whistleblowers who report any violations.