Advertisement
Share

We know how Kansas State’s Bill Snyder voted

This article was originally on a blog post platform and may be missing photos, graphics or links. See About archive blog posts.

We know Bill Snyder is legendary because he votes in the Legends Poll, an exclusive club of 18 former college football coaches who pontificate weekly on the nation’s top college teams.

Monday, though, at age 69, Snyder became an active coach again, resuming command after a three-year hiatus from the Kansas State program that he led from the scrap heap to the brink of a national title in 1998.

Before he un-retired, Snyder sent in his Legends ballot. His top five: Florida, Oklahoma, Alabama, Texas and USC.

Oklahoma Coach Bob Stoops, for what it’s worth, was once an assistant coach on Snyder’s Kansas State staff.

Advertisement

Texas, for what it’s worth, beat Oklahoma this year.

But at least we know where one current Big 12 coach stands. There are seven Big 12 coaches voting in the USA Today coaches’ poll this year, and they could have an important say in determining this year’s national title outcome.

If Oklahoma, Texas and Texas Tech all end up at 11-1, the BCS standings will be used to determine which school advances to play Missouri in the Big 12 title game.

USA Today coaches only have to reveal their final ballots on Dec. 7, however, providing them cover next week in what could be a critical vote.

Not among the seven voting Big 12 coaches is Stoops, who declined an offer to be in the poll.

Why?

‘I’m not going to get into that because then that becomes a story,’ Stoops said during Monday’s Big 12 coaches’ conference call. ‘And I don’t think that’s fair. We have enough to deal with with Oklahoma State this week.’

Was deciding not to be a voter this year a mistake?

‘Probably,’ Stoops said.

-- Chris Dufresne

Photo (top): A 2005 file photo shows Kansas State football Coach Bill Snyder with his team before a game in Manhattan, Kan. Credit: Charlie Riedel / Associated Press

Photo (inset): Oklahoma Coach Bob Stoops in 2007. Credit: Eric Gay / Associated Press


Advertisement