Advertisement

Outdoor Notes : California’s Share Is Nearly $10 Million

California will get nearly $10 million in federal excise tax receipts to support fish and wildlife management and research programs this year, the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service has announced.

California’s share will come out of a total pot of more than $217 million, nearly double the $114 million available last year. Expansion legislation providing for significant increases in excise taxes accounts for the difference.

In fiscal 1986, California will get $5,497,965 for sport fishing restoration, $3,685,721 for wildlife restoration and $453,906 for hunter education.

Money for fish restoration comes from a 10% excise tax on fishing equipment, a 3% tax on electric trolling motors and sonar fish finders, a portion of the federal motorboat-fuels tax and import duties on fishing tackle and pleasure boats. Distribution of funds is based on the land and water areas of each state and the number of fishing license holders.

Advertisement

Funds for wildlife restoration and hunter safety programs come from an 11% tax on sporting arms and ammunition, a 10% tax on pistols and an 11% tax on some archery equipment. Distribution is based on land area, hunting licenses issued and population.

The Department of Fish and Game’s Granite Canyon marine laboratory will have open house May 3. Mass cultivation of red and pink abalones, and the study of clams, scallops and oysters are current projects there.

About 100 60-gallon tanks filled with live sea life will be on display. There will be a photo display, a touch tank for children, programmed spawning of abalone and a sea otter display.

Granite Canyon is nine miles south of Carmel on the ocean side of California 1.

Advertisement


Advertisement
Advertisement