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Reagan Tells U.N. He Sees Moment of Hope for Peace

Associated Press

President Reagan told the United Nations in a farewell speech today that this was “a moment of hope” for peace in the world and that a new U.S.-Soviet treaty to sharply reduce nuclear arms may be concluded next year.

He called for an international war on drug traffickers, terrorism and hostage-taking, and vowed to maintain U.S. support for an armed insurgency against the leftist government of Nicaragua.

He said the Sandinistas were pursuing “the oldest, most corrupt vice of all--man’s age-old will to power, his lust to control the lives and steal the freedoms of others.”

But with his presidency nearing an end, Reagan struck a mostly philosophical stance as he told the 43rd General Assembly session of 159 nations that civil wars and foreign occupations are giving way around the world.

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Reagan said the trend was spurred by “a new era in Soviet-American relations” marked by the continuing withdrawal of the Red Army from Afghanistan and a treaty last year to abolish intermediate-range nuclear missiles.

He said American and Soviet negotiators were making steady progress on another accord to sharply reduce long-range bombers, missiles and submarines. While completion of the pact this year was “highly doubtful,” Reagan said, “I can tell you a year from now (it) is a possibility, more than a possibility.”


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