THE HOUSE

Family Medical Leave

The House upheld President Bush's veto of a bill (S 5) requiring private and public employers to provide up to 12 weeks of unpaid leave annually to employees for family medical reasons. The tally of 258 to 169 fell 27 votes short of the two-thirds majority the House needed to join the Senate in defeating the veto.

James A. Traficant Jr. (D-Ohio), who voted to override, said, "And just think, four short years ago all Mr. Bush wanted was a kinder, gentler America."

Opponent Frank Riggs (R-Santa Rosa) said the timing of the vote by Democrats "is election year politics at its cynical worst."

A yes vote was to enact the family leave bill.

How They Voted Yea Nay No vote Rep. Anderson (D) x Rep. Dixon (D) x Rep. Dymally (D) x Rep. Gallegly (R) x Rep. Levine (D) x Rep. Rohrabacher (R) x

Trade With China

By a vote of 345 to 74, the House overrode President Bush's veto of a bill (HR 5318) requiring China to make internal reforms if it wishes to continue relatively free trade with America. The Senate then upheld the veto. The bill called upon Beijing to stop spreading nuclear technology and to release students arrested during and after the 1989 Tian An Men Square massacre. Override supporter Dan Rostenkowski (D-Ill.) said the United States "wants and expects more responsible (Chinese) behavior in the areas of human rights, trade and weapons non-proliferation . . . ."

Philip M. Crane (R-Ill.) praised the veto of "a thoroughly objectionable bill designed to abolish all reasonable trade relations with China."

A yes vote was to enact the legislation.

How They Voted Yea Nay No vote Rep. Anderson (D) x Rep. Dixon (D) x Rep. Dymally (D) x Rep. Gallegly (R) x Rep. Levine (D) x Rep. Rohrabacher (R) x

Trade With Cuba

By a vote of 276 to 135, the House sent to conference with the Senate a bill (HR 5323) tightening the U.S. trade embargo on Cuba. The bill's most disputed section extends the longstanding embargo on trade by foreign subsidiaries of American firms. Supported by Cuban exiles in the key electoral state of Florida, the bill drew direct support from President Bush and Gov. Bill Clinton of Arkansas. Sponsor Robert G. Torricelli (D-N.J.) said America "will not profit if it means that those profits are going to go to secure military regimes or the tyranny of others."

Opponent Nancy L. Johnson (R-Conn.) said "this bill seeks to punish (Cuban dictator Fidel) Castro by punishing United States companies, United States products and, worst of all, United States jobs."

A yes vote was to pass the bill.

How They Voted Yea Nay No vote Rep. Anderson (D) x Rep. Dixon (D) x Rep. Dymally (D) x Rep. Gallegly (R) x Rep. Levine (D) x Rep. Rohrabacher (R) x

Source: Roll Call Report Syndicate

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