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Mandatory Quake Insurance

In response to “Stitching Together a Disaster Safety Net,” editorial, Jan. 22:

I cannot believe The Times is now calling for mandatory earthquake insurance because “government doesn’t have resources to compensate for disaster produced property loss.” I think the question that we should be asking in light of that statement is, what am I paying taxes for? The police cannot protect me, our schools are war zones and kids are not learning anything anyway, and the richest nation in the world cannot provide basic housing for all of its citizens. Haven’t we learned our lesson from mandatory car insurance? Probably half the drivers in the state do not have car insurance because it is too expensive. What are you going to do when a homeowner cannot afford earthquake insurance? Put him in jail? Tell him tough luck about your home?

The last thing we need is another government agency soaking up more money that we seemingly do not have. I think The Times would better serve the community by looking at how government is wasting our tax dollars rather than encouraging government to take more. It’s a pretty pathetic situation in California when the only way to get some type of service out of government is to tax ourselves.

ROBERT J. BOCK JR.

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Fullerton

Your otherwise excellent editorial suggesting that Congress require earthquake insurance for all Californians stopped short of an effective solution.

What makes more sense is mandating “natural disaster insurance” for all Americans. This would cover not just earthquakes but floods, mudslides, tornadoes, hurricanes, drought, freeze damage and other nasty surprises from Mother Nature. After all, not long ago homes and businesses without flood insurance here in the Valley and across the Midwest were inundated, so why focus on just one peril?

By pooling all these natural risks across all state lines, there would be enough cash to cover the inevitable disasters without having to use tax dollars to bail out their victims.

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ALEXANDER AUERBACH

Sherman Oaks

Regarding earthquakes, fires, riots, crime, traffic, pollution, mudslides, etc.: Los Angeles can really be like hell--there are a lot of drawbacks but at least it’s warm!

DREW PAXTON

Santa Monica


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