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Harold C. Brown; Judge, Brother of Former Gov. Pat Brown

Harold C. Brown, 90, whose appointment to the state Court of Appeal by his brother generated accusations of conflict of interest. A respected lawyer as well as member of the Brown political clan, Harold C. Brown abandoned attempts to win a federal judicial appointment in 1961 to campaign for his brother, Gov. Edmund G. “Pat” Brown. On Sept. 13, 1964, Democratic Gov. Brown appointed him to the San Francisco Municipal Court, joking that the act required soul-searching as Harold was a Republican. Two years later, other Republicans criticized the governor for elevating Brown to the California Court of Appeal. The justice served until his retirement in 1976. The two brothers had founded the San Francisco chapter of the Order of Cincinnatus, which promoted the idea that elected officials should not promise favors and supporters should not ask for them. Justice Brown served on the board of the Marin Humane Society and was active in other animal welfare and environmental organizations. On May 19 in San Rafael, Calif.

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Carl H. Builder; Rand Analyst and Military Expert

Carl H. Builder, 67, an eclectic Rand Corp. analyst and expert on military institutions. Educated as an engineer at the Naval Academy and UCLA, Builder held patents for the operation and design for the liquid air cycle engine, an air-breathing rocket propulsion system. In addition to his articles in scholarly journals, Builder was well known for writing two critically acclaimed books on the American military, “Masks of War” and “The Icarus Syndrome.” During his 29 years at the Santa Monica-based think tank Rand, Builder served as advisor and consultant to the Army, Air Force and the Nuclear Regulatory Commission. He was the NRC’s first director of nuclear safeguards. In his later years, he was a much-sought speaker on the future implications of information technology for national security. Builder assisted the South Coast Air Quality Management District in reformulating the strategies to control air pollution in the Los Angeles Basin. On May 20 in Culver City of cancer.

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Joan F. DuBois; Philanthropic Foundation Executive

Joan FitzGerald DuBois, 50, philanthropic foundation executive. A graduate of St. Joseph’s College for Women in New York City and the New York University School of Law, DuBois spent a dozen years working with Howard B. Keck as program vice president of the Keck Foundation. She established the $1-billion organization’s grant programs in medical research and law and its special grants for Southern California institutions. Earlier in her career, DuBois was a founding member, attorney and planner for the Children’s Defense Fund in New York and Cambridge, Mass. As a consultant, she influenced and even wrote many state laws concerning children and child abuse. Her work on a District of Columbia child abuse law became the model for the National Child Abuse and Neglect Reporting Law. In Los Angeles, DuBois worked with the Los Angeles Regional Family Planning Council, the Junior League of Los Angeles and the Blue Ribbon support group for the Music Center of Los Angeles County. On May 20 while on vacation in Calgary, Canada, of a heart attack.

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Telford Taylor; Prosecuted Nazi War Criminals at Nuremberg

Telford Taylor, 90, who prosecuted Nazi war criminals at Nuremberg. Born in Schenectady, N.Y., Taylor graduated from Harvard Law School and later taught at Columbia University School of Law with visiting professorships at Harvard and Yale. A noted liberal author and activist, Taylor was credited with laying the foundation for human rights movements and particularly the principle that governments be held accountable for mistreating citizens. He spoke out and wrote against Sen. Joseph McCarthy’s anti-Communist activities in the 1950s and against the Vietnam War in the 1970s, notably in his book “Nuremberg and Vietnam: An American Tragedy.” But Taylor is best known as assistant prosecutor of the 21 key Nazis put on trial Nov. 20, 1945, and chief prosecutor of about 200 others in a score of trials at Nuremberg between 1946 and 1949. He described his experiences in the 1992 book, “The Anatomy of the Nuremberg Trials: A Personal Memoir.” Taylor began his Army duty in 1942 in military intelligence and as prosecutor rose to the rank of brigadier general. On Saturday in New York City after a series of strokes.


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