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‘Star Trek’ series focusing on Picard character will shoot in California

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Patrick Stewart as Captain Jean-Luc Picard in the 2002 movie “Star Trek Nemesis.”
(Sam Emerson / Paramount Pictures)

A highly anticipated new “Star Trek” series focusing on the Capt. Jean-Luc Picard character will shoot in California thanks to $15.6 million in state tax credits for the CBS All Access show.

The untitled “Star Trek” series, which is set to debut on the streaming service in 2019, is one of nine TV shows that have qualified for the latest round of California tax credits. Another sci-fi series — the third season of Fox’s “The Orville” — is set to receive $15.8 million in credits, the most of any show in the current funding round.

A total of $90 million in tax credits is reserved for the nine projects, according to the California Film Commission, which oversees the program. The shows — three new and six recurring — are on track to spend nearly $456 million in qualified expenditures, which exclude star salaries and other above-the-line expenses. They will employ an estimated 1,820 cast members, 2,140 crew, and 25,000 extras/stand-ins.

CBS’ decision to shoot the new “Star Trek” in California represents a sort-of homecoming for the enduring sci-fi brand. Although “Star Trek: The Next Generation,” which ran from 1987 to 1994, was filmed primarily in the Los Angeles area, the more recent series “Star Trek: Discovery” has been shot in Toronto.

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A new series from HBO with the working title “Flowers of Helvetica” has been approved for $12 million in credits.

“Why Women Kill,” a new series from CBS, is expected to receive $8.5 million in credits, while the ninth season of FX’s “American Horror Story” will get $8.9 million.

California’s tax credit program hands out $330 million annually to select TV shows and films. The program excludes reality shows and half-hour scripted shows that have not relocated from other states.

Filmmakers can recoup as much as 25% of their spending —up to the first $100 million — on crew salaries and other qualified costs, such as building of sets. Studios can then use the credits to offset state tax liabilities in California.

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david.ng@latimes.com

@DavidNgLAT


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