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Historic home of baseball great Ralph Kiner seeks a buyer in Rancho Mirage

Ralph Kiner’s single-story home, built in 1952, showcases Midcentury style.
The single-story home, built in 1952, showcases Midcentury style.
(Realtor.com)

Coachella Valley is home to some of the most striking Midcentury architecture in all of California, and E. Stewart Williams is responsible for a lot of it. The prolific architect’s many works include Frank Sinatra’s famous Twin Palms house, the chic Edris House and the Palm Springs Desert Museum.

Another of his works, a stylish spot he built for late MLB legend Ralph Kiner, just hit the market for $1.095 million.

Sprawling across a quarter of an acre in Thunderbird Country Club, the 1950s home was only the second one built in the community, according to the listing. The low-lying abode packs three bedrooms and 3.5 bathrooms into a single story.

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Splashes of brick and burnt orange adorn the otherwise-white exterior, which features a hedge-lined driveway and landscaped courtyard. Inside, an expansive open floor plan anchors the 2,444-square-foot interior.

Lined with glass and topped by wood beams, the space includes a sunny living room, open dining area and a kitchen with rounded countertops. A wall of stone holds a fireplace. Limestone floors run underneath.

Outside, palm trees border the saltwater pool and spa. The backyard, complete with patio, lawn, fire pit and grill, enjoys mountain and golf course views.

Chuck Bennett of HK Lane Real Estate holds the listing.

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During his 10 years in Major League Baseball, Kiner was a six-time all-star and seven-time National League home run leader. After retiring, he served as an announcer for the New York Mets and was inducted into the Baseball Hall of Fame in 1975. In 2014, he died at the age of 91.


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