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Hearst heiress pays $10.72 million for Malibu beach house

Built in 1930, the coastal home overlooks the ocean from an entertaining terrace and raised wood deck.
(Hilton & Hyland)

It’s no Hearst Castle, but Anne Hearst’s new place is still pretty nice. The granddaughter of publishing magnate William Randolph Hearst and her husband, novelist Jay McInerney, just paid $10.72 million for a Malibu beach house, The Times has confirmed.

The oceanfront home hit the market over the summer for $11.95 million — the first time it was offered in more than 40 years. The purchase comes about a year after the publishing heiress’ home in the Hamptons was reportedly destroyed in a fire.

Built in 1930, the two-story home sits on one of Southern California’s most exclusive stretches of sand, Malibu Colony Beach, which at one point was the priciest neighborhood in all of Los Angeles County.

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The listing identifies the house as a California bungalow, and it takes full advantage of the coastal setting with an entertaining terrace that ascends to a raised wood deck overlooking the coastline. Inside, four bedrooms and four bathrooms are spread across 2,520 square feet.

Lumber offsets the whitewashed floor plan, as beamed ceilings top parquet wood floors in the common spaces. The living room boasts a brick fireplace, and other highlights include an open-concept dining area and galley-style kitchen lined with yellow tile.

Hearst — a socialite, philanthropist and publishing heiress — is the daughter of former Hearst Chairman Randolph Apperson Hearst and the sister of Patty Hearst, who was kidnapped by the Symbionese Liberation Army in the 1970s.

McInerney has been writing novels since the ‘80s with titles including “Story of My Life,” “Brightness Falls” and “Bright Lights, Big City,” which was adapted into a movie starring Michael J. Fox. The pair married in 2006.

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Hilton & Hyland’s Chad Rogers held the listing. Rick Hilton, Barron N. Hilton and Chad Rogers, all with Hilton & Hyland, represented Hearst and McInerney.


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