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Marilyn Monroe’s onetime Brentwood home sells for over the asking price

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The Brentwood home once owned by Marilyn Monroe has sold for $7.25 million, or $325,000 above the asking price.

The Brentwood home once owned by Marilyn Monroe has sold for $7.25 million, or $325,000 above the asking price.

The residence, built in 1929, was the only property the singer, actress and model owned independent of a husband. She bought the property in the early 1960s following the end of her third marriage, to playwright Arthur Miller, for $75,000.

The hacienda-style house came partially furnished, and her mortgage payments were $320 a month, according to reports in The Times following Monroe’s death in 1962.

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Set behind gates at the end of a cul-de-sac, the single-story home has 2,624 square feet of living space, four bedrooms and three bathrooms. Common areas include a formal living room with a fireplace, a family room and an office. Saltillo tile floors and beamed ceilings are among the interior details.

Outdoors, lawns surround a brick patio and kidney-shaped swimming pool. Mature trees, a guest house and a small citrus grove fill out the half-acre grounds.

The property had been listed for $6.9 million. Lisa Optican of Mercer Vine had the listing. Richard Stearns of Partners Trust represented the buyer.

Monroe, who was 36 when she died, starred in box-office hits including “Some Like It Hot” (1959) and “Gentlemen Prefer Blondes” (1953).

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neal.leitereg@latimes.com

Twitter: @LATHotProperty

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