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Marilyn Monroe and Joe DiMaggio’s onetime love nest lists in the Hollywood Hills

Marilyn Monroe and Joe DiMaggio’s onetime love nest lists in the Hollywood Hills
In the Hollywood Hills, a Mediterranean-style home once shared by Marilyn Monroe and Joe DiMaggio is on the market for $2.695 million. (Coldwell Banker Residential Brokerage)

Tucked into the Hollywood Hills, a Mediterranean-style residence once shared by Marilyn Monroe and Joe DiMaggio is on the market for $2.695 million.

Monroe’s connection to the property is tied back to a $237 check she signed in 1953 to lease the property. The check came to light three years ago when it was put up for auction but failed to sell after not meeting the reserve price.

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The pop-culture icon and the Yankees slugger, married briefly in the early 1950s, aren’t the only Hollywood names tied to the 1938 home; husband-and-wife screenwriters Roger Simon and Sheryl Longin sold the property in July for $2.2 million.

A remodel has changed the look since then, swapping a vibrant, multicolored facade for a whitewashed exterior. In 3,335 square feet, there are four bedrooms, 4.5 bathrooms and a handful of living spaces topped with vaulted and beamed ceilings.

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A floor-to-ceiling brick fireplace anchors the living room, which opens through French doors to a covered deck. Other living spaces include a formal dining room and a kitchen with tile on the walls and floors.

Another floor-to-ceiling fireplace, this one painted white, is found in the master suite. The space extends to a private balcony that overlooks a landscaped backyard with a pool and spa.

Neal Baddin of Coldwell Banker Residential Brokerage holds the listing.

Monroe starred in the films “Niagara” and “The Seven Year Itch,” among others, before her death in 1962 at the age of 36.

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DiMaggio, a three-time MVP, won nine World Series titles with the Yankees and boasts the longest hitting streak in Major League Baseball history at 56 games.

The pair were married in 1954 for nine months.

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