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Entertainment & Arts

Calendar feedback: Watching ‘Watchmen’

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Regina King and Andrew Howard in “Watchmen,” which has readers talking.
(Mark Hill/HBO)

Watching how we watch ‘Watchmen’

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Regarding “Really Lost on Show’s Appeal” [Dec.14], Lorraine Ali And Robert Lloyd’s discussion of “Watchmen” on HBO: I’m so glad to know that I’m not the only one watching “Watchmen” and noticing that it makes less sense the longer it goes on. I’ll finish the season, but barring a narrative miracle, I’m out after that.

Renee Leask

Glendale

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An entertainment constructed upon the facile conceit of women as avengers of justice is as dangerously simplistic as the credo of the Black Panthers, whose avenging of racial and other perceived wrongs employed tactics arguably as repressive, if not moreso, as those employed by the most fascist of states. I would be as fearful were my family and I living in Sister Knight’s world as I would in Nazi Germany.

Jeff Denker

Malibu

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Over the years, I’ve found your columns to be intelligent and thoughtful but today’s article on “Watchmen” is very far off the mark. I am a big admirer of “Watchmen” the graphic novel, which is one of the great works of art of our time. It proves that the graphic novel is a distinct art form. The TV show does a good job of translating the artistic sensibilities of the graphic novel into a television format.

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Ed Greenman

Los Angeles

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Reading Lorraine Ali and Robert Lloyd’s back-and-forth discussion of their confusion with “Watchmen” was akin to listening to two anti-vaxxers discuss the science behind vaccines, or watching climate change deniers try to discuss climatology.

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Diana Davis

North Hollywood

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I really enjoyed your article on the television series “Watchmen.” I read Ali’s opinions on the series as well and can’t say that I agree with her on everything she said. I don’t think the show normalizes white supremacy, but shines light on the issue at hand, in a new age and modern way.

This TV show has definitely sparked much needed conversations about racism, crime and corrupt police.

Cashia Kirksey

Los Angeles

The important art of protest

Regarding Carolina Miranda’s “Year in Review: A Defiant Anthem”: Hurrah for the Chilean women’s art collective for bringing attention to the problem of rape, which degrades and humiliates women.

They have gotten the attention of many countries. This protest movement reminds one of the Chilean women who sewed Arpilleras depicting scenes of what was happening during the Pinochet dictatorship. They protested the disappearances, the murder of their sons and husbands. The women’s sewing was sent out of the country to draw attention to what was happening in their country. At the Museum of Latin American Art in Long Beach, there is now an exhibition of the women’s art protest movement.

Lynne Okon Scholnick

Long Beach

A beautiful story of friendship

Thank you, John Penner for the wonderful, touching article on Milos Forman and Ivan Passer’s friendship [“Milos, Ivan and the Great Escape to Hollywood,” Dec. 14]. I had the privilege of working with Forman on two films. He had such a complex life, filled with triumph and tragedy, yet he was endlessly fun, starting every meeting with “Tell me the gossip!”

He delighted in mischief and provoking those in power.

Milos always talked warmly about Ivan. Their friendship, along with the rest of their Czech cohorts, was remarkable. With Milos, all roads led back to his beginnings. It’s lovely that The Times paid tribute to these two talented, generous men.

Scott Alexander

Los Angeles

That’s the best he’s got, really?

In reading Kenneth Turan’s “The Year in Review: The Winner’s Circle” best movies of 2019, I was gobsmacked by the omission of two films that are sure to be on most best of lists: “Jojo Rabbit” and “Parasite.” I won’t call out any films that he named specifically as less than these two, but suffice it to say that the writers/directors of these masterpieces are some of the most strikingly unique voices in cinema today.

Their omission makes one think Mr. Turan’s judgment was momentarily altered by exhaust fumes.

Steve Apostolina

Burbank

A tune for the City of Angels

Regarding “L.A. Songs Hall of Fame” section [of the Dec. 8 “50 Songs for a New L.A.” project by Randall Roberts]: One of the best songs about L.A. is “Angel Town” by Jay Livingston and Ray Evans. Written in 1959, the song was inspired by Gene Sherman’s column in the Los Angeles Times and dedicated by him to an angel. I’ve hummed that tune for the last 60 years.

Helen Seid

Culver City

Truth hurts, but she’s not a ‘thing’

Regarding: “The Year In Review: Living Her Best Life” [Dec. 15]: I’m appalled by this: “How Lizzo became the one thing we all loved this year,” and the online headline, “100% her year: How Lizzo became the one thing we all loved in 2019.”

I had no idea Lizzo was a thing. I thought she was a person.

Lynn V. Baden

Anaheim

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“We” did not all love Lizzo this year. I was appalled to see her on the front page of the Calendar section. After her antics at the Lakers game, she shouldn’t be featured or celebrated in any prestigious publication.

Sandy Grady

Los Angeles

Would you like to spin or solve?

Regarding “‘Wheel’ Spins to Vanna” [Dec. 11]: Really? Vanna White is in the news? Is that all you’ve got? Talk about a slow news day.

Next you’ll be writing about Justin Bieber‘s new look and the Kardashians going Christmas shopping.

Rick Mervis

Northridge

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Robert Lloyd is right that by hosting “Wheel of Fortune” while Pat Sajak recovers from surgery, Vanna White breaks up a long “procession of dudes in suits” — or, to borrow a line from “The Golden Girls,” “a lot of teeth and polyester.”

It’s worth noting two exceptions: Meredith Vieira, who twice won the Best Game Show Host Emmy for “Who Wants to be a Millionaire,” and the incomparable Betty White, who became the first woman to win the category for 1983’s “Just Men!”

Other female nominees have included Susan Stafford, Carnie Wilson, Brooke Burns and Vicki Lawrence.

Jordan Chodorow

Los Angeles

It was ‘chillingly familiar’ indeed

Reading Carol Clark’s letter about “El Sueño Americano” at the Skirball [“Calendar Feedback: A Chillingly Familiar Show,” Dec. 15]: I agreed, and upon seeing this exhibit, especially the photograph of a pile of shoelaces, I immediately thought of the photos of shoes at Auschwitz.

As a Skirball volunteer, I am fortunate enough to be able to visit this exhibit often and am always chilled to the bone.

Joanne Serin

Sherman Oaks

Sing it for those on the outside

Regarding “Rampart Records’ Essential Box Set Mines East L.A.'s 1960s and ’70s Soul-funk Scene” [Dec. 12]: I found this online article an interesting read. I always appreciate the effort made by The Times to preserve and magnify music that is not typically heard to mainstream audiences. To add on showing talents from the past that originated in my hometown of East Los Angeles also rekindles my passion for music (specifically funk) and makes it seem plausible that someone from that area could in fact become successful.

Joseph Rivera

Los Angeles

Will Harvey get the Roger treament?

Regarding film critic Kenneth Turan’s review “‘Bombshell’ Explodes on the Screen” [Dec.13]: “Bombshell” is a movie about “media titan” Roger Ailes and Fox News. Let’s see if anyone in Hollywood will dare make a movie about Harvey Weinstein.

Oscar “Boomer” Rosalez

Diamond Bar


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