Glenn Gould
11 Images

Glenn Gould

Glenn Gould
The prodigy, age 6 or 7, practices a Christmas carol. This image is from the new book “Glenn Gould: A Life in Pictures,” a collection of more than 200 black-and-white photographs. (Estate of Glenn Gould / Firefly Books, 2007)
Glenn Gould
Glenn, about 11, plays croquet with his piano teacher, Alberto Guerrero. Guerrero would push down on the boy’s shoulders as he played, though Glenn pushed back. “The teacher, of course, prevailed,” Tim Page writes in “Glenn Gould: A Life in Pictures.” (Estate of Glenn Gould / Firefly Books, 2007)
Glenn Gould
Gould rehearses in July 1956 at the Stratford Shakespeare Festival in his native Canada. The 23-year-old musician, who had played in its first season three years earlier, was invited in 1956 to be a co-director of new musical programs at the festival. From “Glenn Gould: A Life in Pictures.” (Herb Nott, Stratford Festival/Firefly Books, 2007)
Glenn Gould
Gould’s work “The Idea of North” was, he said, “an opportunity to examine that condition of solitude which is neither exclusive to the north nor the prerogative of those who go north but which does, perhaps appear ... a bit more clearly to those who have made, if only in their imagination, the journey north.” From “Glenn Gould: A Life in Pictures.” (Harold Whyte, Canadian Broadcasting Corp. Still Photo Collection, Toronto / Firefly Books, 2007)
Glenn Gould
Gould made his New York recital debut at Town Hall on Jan. 11, 1955. The program “started with something very slow,” David Oppenheim of Columbia Records recalled, referring to J.P. Sweelinck’s Fantasia. Gould “set such a religious atmosphere that it was just mesmerizing. And it didn’t take more than five or six notes to establish that atmosphere, by some magic of precise rhythm and control of the inner voices.” From “Glenn Gould: A Life in Pictures.” (Paul Rockett / Firefly Books, 2007)
Glenn Gould
Gould, in the studio, listens to a playback of Haydn’s Piano Sonata in E flat major in January 1958. From “Glenn Gould: A Life in Pictures.” (Don Hunstein, Sony Classical / Firefly Books, 2007)
Glenn Gould
Gould, listening to the playback of Haydn’s Piano Sonata in E flat major in January 1958. From “Glenn Gould: A Life in Pictures.” (Don Hunstein, Sony Classical / Firefly Books, 2007)
Glenn Gould
One more view of Gould listening to a playback in January 1958. From “Glenn Gould: A Life in Pictures.” (Don Hunstein, Sony Classical / Firefly Books, 2007)
Glenn Gould
Gould cultivated the image of isolated artist, Tim Page writes, and often through photographs taken for album covers. This image from 1974 by Columbia Records photographer Don Hunstein was later used for Gould’s CD release of Sibelius piano music. From “Glenn Gould: A Life in Pictures.” (Don Hunstein, Sony Classical / Firefly Books, 2007)
Glenn Gould
Gould said he could play only if hunched over the keyboard, a remnant of the teaching methods of Alberto Guerrero. The pianist’s father, Bert, sawed the legs off a high-backed wooden folding chair and inserted long screws into the feet. Gould could adjust the screws to the desired height. He continued to use the chair even after the seat started to come apart. From “Glenn Gould: A Life in Pictures.” (Robert Ragsdale / Firefly Books, 2007)
Glenn Gould
Gould, who launched his recording career more than 25 years earlier with Bach’s “Goldberg” Variations, decided to record them again in 1981. In doing so, Tim Page writes, Gould was seeking what he called “a way of making some sort of almost mathematical correspondence between the theme and subsequent variations.” The record came out in September 1982 -- a few weeks later Gould was dead. From “Glenn Gould: A Life in Pictures.” (Don Hunstein, Sony Classical / Firefly Books, 2007)
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