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Television

‘How to Get Away with Murder’ recap: There are eyes everywhere

Viola Davis

Viola Davis appears in a scene from “How to Get Away With Murder.”

(Mitchell Haaseth / ABC )

A good rule of thumb when it comes to Annalise Keating (Viola Davis) and her cohorts is that nothing is secret and that it’s pretty much guaranteed they are being watched with every step they take.

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This week’s episode “Two Birds, One Millstone” -- an excellent play on words, by the way -- starts like all the rest, with a flash forward to the shooting of Annalise. However, this time she is being wheeled into the hospital as Frank (Charlie Weber) is frantically running alongside pleading with the doctors to save her life.

When she flat-lines, two nurses jump into CPR-mode while another escorts Frank out of the hospital. Once out of sight from the hospital’s security cameras, Frank drops his act and heads back to his car, which is holding a pretty dead looking Catherine (Amy Okuda) in the back seat -- I guess you can never say that “How to Get Away with Murder” doesn’t know how to start off with a bang.  

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Back in the present, Annalise has just finished convincing Asher (Matt McGorry) not to testify against Bonnie when she is pulled into another case -- this time defending a fellow professor who killed her abusive husband out of self-defense when he tried to attack her.

Seems like a cut-and-dried case, right? Wrong. The professor happens to be transgender, and when the police find this out, they use her sexual orientation against her as a motive for why she would want to kill her husband. Turns out that her husband did beat her but that she did a good job of hiding it -- so good that the police and Annalise can’t find any evidence of past beatings except for a coached witness who happens to be a student.

As Annalise struggles with getting her colleague out of jail, the Keating Five are tasked with finding another suspect in the Caleb (Kendrick Sampson) and Catherine murder trial. After hours of digging -- and some illegal hacking -- the gang finds out that Caleb and Catherine’s aunt, who was murdered right after she testified, had a secret son that she put up for adoption. A secret son who would benefit greatly from the death of his birth mother and Caleb’s and Catherine’s parents. Sounds like a quite the motive, huh? 

While the gang is finding out some shocking and case-changing news, Annalise is able to get the charges against her colleague dropped and make sure that Emily Sinclair (Sarah Burns) leaves her and her team alone -- judging from her body at the mansion, this doesn’t pan out well -- by handing over to the D.A.’s office files that prove federal judge Millstone (John Posey), Asher’s father, is guilty of corruption.

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Once again in the final minutes of the episode, things get hectic. Oliver (Conrad Ricamora), Connor’s (Jack Falahee) boyfriend, couldn’t help but snoop around on the new suspect and ends up finding out where he lives and hacking his computer. Little does Oliver know that the suspect is watching their entire conversation on his computer, and knows they are on to him. 

Meanwhile, Wes (Alfred Enoch) and Annalise finally have it out over Rebecca, who Annalise claims ran away and can’t be found -- this would be much more convincing if Annalise didn’t lie about everything -- and he reluctantly agrees to believe her -- but does he really?

When Annalise leaves Wes, she calls Frank to make sure he has taken care of the problem -- that problem being, of course, Rebecca’s body, which Frank is disposing of at that exact moment. Things all of the sudden flash forward, with Frank disposing of Catherine’s body in a similar way -- except that when the police find Catherine, she suddenly wakes up gasping for breath. Talk about a cliffhanger. 

So what did you think of the episode? What is Frank up to and what role did Catherine play in his plan? What is the adoptive son of Caleb’s and Catherine’s aunt going to do to Oliver and Connor? Sound off in the comments and check back for what trouble Annalise and her crew get themselves into next week. 

Suspects so far in Annalise’s shooting:

Frank: He put on quite the show at the hospital, but then easily slipped backed into his steely, cold self once past the security cameras. Had he finally had enough with being Annalise’s Mr. Fix-it and tried to rid himself of her for good? 

Bonnie: Running from the scene of the shooting, washing blood off herself and changing clothes looks pretty suspicious. Annalise doesn’t always treat Bonnie very well, so could Bonnie finally have snapped and shot her? 

Levi: Rebecca’s foster brother sure seems like he is out for revenge and pretty much assumes that Annalise is responsible for his foster sister’s death, so maybe he is the one who shot her.

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Nate: OK, honestly, he has the biggest motive of all after what Annalise has put him through. Also, he is driving the other students around and seems to have a pretty sure plan in place. Did he orchestrate the shooting?

Wes: Will he snaps find out about what really happened to Rebecca and snap? Who knows, but he definitely has a motive.

Connor: At first he seemed a little guilty by saying this was her fault and that everything was her fault as she lay dying. However, with their increasing tension and after last episode’s confrontation, it looks like he has a bit more of a motive. Could he have pulled the trigger? 

Caleb and Catherine: The shooting still took place at their mansion, which looks a bit suspicious, and Caleb was waiting for Michaela at her apartment; something isn’t right there. 

Best quotes:

“Do whatever you need to do to silence the lambs, or I will serial kill you.” -- Michaela Pratt (Aja Naomi King)

“I’ll handle him the way I always do; right now I have to go handle a bitch.” -- Annalise Keating (Viola Davis)

Follow me on Twitter @ShannonOConnor0

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