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Detroit Trash jewelry line appeals to people who seek treasure

Detroit Trash jewelry line appeals to people who seek treasure
Tiffany Allison sets out necklaces made from "Detroit trash" at a flea market outside Fairfax High School. (Francine Orr / Los Angeles Times)

Detroit's efforts to once again become a vibrant and self-sustaining city has gained some cachet with L.A. residents, says Detroit native Tiffany Allison.

She sees that with her jewelry line, Detroit Trash. She is the granddaughter of an antiques dealer and learned from him the value of lots of tiny items, "little bits of history," as she calls them. They include Masonic star pendants from a jewelry store that burned down, keys to auto workers' lockers and metal ID tags for the workers' tools, high school class rings, carnival prizes and miniature license plates.

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Detroit Trash is the resulting line of jewelry that includes necklaces that combine those pieces on chains. Allison sells the necklaces at a stall at the Sunday Melrose Trading Post flea market in the parking lot of Fairfax High School. Around $20 each, they're unique and affordable. They're also online, of course.

"Especially in L.A., everyone wants something different," she says. "Everyone is trying to be cooler. I can sell you something no one else has."

"We love Detroit," says Allison, who hopes her jewelry spreads some of that love around.

Twitter: @mmacvean

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