Tyre House
12 Images

‘A. Quincy Jones: Building for Better Living’

A. Quincy Jones and Frederick Emmons’ plan for the 1951-1954 Tyre House featured an airy, glassed-in living room with a ceiling that gently sloped toward a floating fireplace, creating a more intimate side of the house. (Charles E. Young Research Library / UCLA Library Special Collections)
The Tyre House today, recently renovated by the Los Angeles architecture firm Escher GuneWardena and featured in an article and photo gallery on L.A. at Home.  (Jason Schmidt / Hammer Museum, Los Angeles)
This rendering shows the open-air living room of the 1948-1951 Sidney and Frances Brody House, a collaboration between architect A. Quincy Jones, decorator William Haines and landscape architect Garrett Eckbo. (Huntington Library, Art Collections and Botanical Gardens)
The entrance to the Brody House, which has been the subject of much coverage in the past few years. You can read Jeffrey Head’s article on the landscape design by the great Garrett Eckbo, see our related photo gallery and read the buzz over the selling of the house.  (Jason Schmidt / Hammer Museum, Los Angeles)
A. Quincy Jones’ Los Angeles house, 1969-1973, for Marvin and Sandy Smalley. L.A. at Home revisited the home and its current owner a few years ago in an extensive photo gallery(Jason Schmidt / Hammer Museum, Los Angeles)
A. Quincy Jones and Frederick E. Emmons’ model home for the Fairhaven Tract, a Joseph Eichler development in Orange that dates to 1961. (Jason Schmidt / Hammer Museum, Los Angeles)
Some of A. Quincy Jones’ best known work was for the Mutual Housing Assn. in the Crestwood Hills neighborhood of Los Angeles. Pictured here: Schneidman House, a Jones collaboration with Whitney Smith and Edgardo Contini, 1946-1950.  (Jason Schmidt / Hammer Museum, Los Angeles)
Office of the Mutual Housing Assn., Los Angeles, 1946-1950, by A. Quincy Jones, Whitney Smith and Edgardo Contini.  (Jason Schmidt / Hammer Museum, Los Angeles)
An elegant connection to the outdoors is a hallmark of the Gross House, 1946-1950, part of the Mutual Housing Assn. in Los Angeles by A. Quincy Jones, Whitney Smith and Edgardo Contini. (Jason Schmidt / Hammer Museum, Los Angeles)
A. Quincy Jones’ last work: the Warner Bros. Records building, 1971-75, in Burbank.  (Jason Schmidt / Hammer Museum, Los Angeles)
The Studio City church, 1960-1962, as seen today. (Jason Schmidt / Hammer Museum, Los Angeles)
The Los Angeles office of A. Quincy Jones and Frederick E. Emmons, Architects, 1954-1955 (phase 1), 1957-1959 (addition).  (Jason Schmidt / Hammer Museum, Los Angeles)
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