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Thomas Curwen

Thomas Curwen is an award-winning staff writer for the Los Angeles Times, where he has worked as editor of the Outdoors section, deputy editor of the Book Review and an editor at large for features. He was named Journalist of the Year by the Los Angeles Press Club for his work in 2017. He was part of the team of Times reporters who won a Pulitzer for their work covering the 2015 terrorist attack in San Bernardino, and in 2008 he was a finalist for a Pulitzer Prize for his story about a father and daughter who were attacked by a grizzly bear in Montana. He has received a Rosalynn Carter Fellowship for mental health journalism and was honored by the Academy of American Poets.
Behind the story: Step into this Tongva classroom and witness love in an act of redemption

The study of Tongva, the language of Los Angeles' native people, offers a glimpse of a Southern California that no longer exists. Listening to its cadences among students led by UCLA linguist Pam Munro, I was transported back to a time before this city existed.

Tongva, L.A.’s first language, opens the door to a forgotten time and place

For decades Tongva, the language of the first people who lived in the Los Angeles region, was consigned to notebooks and papers hidden away in museums. Through the efforts of a UCLA linguist, Tongva is being spoken again.

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