Some reading for the trip
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From Little Saigon to San Jose, a faithful bus connection

Bus driver Tam Le passes out Vietnamese newspapers to passengers before heading to San Jose. The Xe Do Hoang bus line connects Little Saigon with San Jose, the two largest Vietnamese American communities in the country. (Cheryl A. Guerrero / Los Angeles Times)
A man who asked for anonymity helps unload boxes transported from Westminster to San Jose on the Xe Do Hoang bus line. (Cheryl A. Guerrero / Los Angeles Times)
A package is weighed before being transported to San Jose on the Xe Do Hoang bus line. The passenger ticket price -- $40 each way -- includes a banh mi sandwich and a bottle of water. (Cheryl A. Guerrero / Los Angeles Times)
Vietnamese American bus riders travel to Westminster from San Jose. Customers can make reservations if they like, but that doesn’t get them a good seat. Those are first-come, first-served. (Cheryl A. Guerrero / Los Angeles Times)
Hong Thi Le, 87, bundles up for the ride home to Westminster’s Little Saigon after visiting her grandchildren in San Jose. (Cheryl A. Guerrero / Los Angeles Times)
Dung Nguyen, right, crochets while riding the bus from Westminster to San Jose. The bus pulls out of a grocery store parking lot in Little Saigon each morning and chugs into San Jose by midafternoon. (Cheryl A. Guerrero / Los Angeles Times)
Dong Nguyen, from left, Tau Pham, 81, and other passengers travel from Westminster to San Jose. The music that spills from the speakers is from “Paris by Night,” the long-running and ever-popular Vietnamese variety show. (Cheryl A. Guerrero / Los Angeles Times)
Tran Thu Huong, from left, Le Thi Tam and Edmund Florendo aboard the Xe Do Hoang bus. In a culture where people tend to show up when they want to show up, the punctuality of this bus line stands out. (Cheryl A. Guerrero / Los Angeles Times)
Hong Thi Le, left, shows family photographs while traveling back home to Westminster. “I can talk to anyone on the bus. It’s easy to meet new people,” she says. “I just don’t feel comfortable on the airplane.” (Cheryl A. Guerrero / Los Angeles Times)
Passengers get off the Xe Do Hoang bus for a 15-minute break. Most of the customers are Vietnamese Americans. But more and more, there are Chinese, Koreans, Latinos and a sprinkling of whites who catch wind of the bus and its cheap direct route across the state. (Cheryl A. Guerrero / Los Angeles Times)
Because many Xe Do Hoang passengers speak little English, all of the bus line’s drivers speak Vietnamese. (Cheryl A. Guerrero / Los Angeles Times)
Travelers carry their bags after arriving in San Jose from Westminster. The line’s owner, Linh Hoang Nguyen, stumbled onto the idea of connecting the two cities while waiting for a flight at John Wayne Airport. He now has a fleet of 11 buses and 15 drivers. (Cheryl A. Guerrero / Los Angeles Times)
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