Advertisement
California

Angelenos, protesters: Prepare to get wet

Groups of Southern Californians protesting President Trump march towards City Hall.

Get ready to get wet, protesters.

As thousands of demonstrators prepared to converge on downtown Los Angeles on Friday to protest the inauguration of Donald Trump, the second in a trio of anticipated storms was already soaking much of the region. 

“Any protests going on in Southern California will most likely be wet,” said National Weather Service forecaster Ryan Kittell. “People need to definitely take precautions, wear some rain jackets, bring umbrellas. … It’s definitely going to be a wet day.”

The storm could deposit up to 2 inches of rain in Los Angeles by the end of the day.

Advertisement

“I guess it’ll match what you see on TV because I think they’re supposed to get a little rain in Washington, D.C.,” Kittell said. “It’ll make you feel like you’re there.”

Parts of Los Angeles and Ventura counties were issued warnings of potential thunderstorms, hail and waterspouts.  

The Los Angeles Police Department has issued five permits for protests around the downtown area for Friday. Police said they could not provide an estimate for the number of protesters who might show up. 

In a tweet, the department warned people to be mindful of the rainy weather and to drive safely. 

Advertisement

While the rain is expected to impact traffic, so will a number of downtown street closures that are being imposed because of protests. 

If thunderstorms do occur, they will take place in the afternoon, throughout the county, Kittell said. The rain is expected to taper off quickly in the evening. 

On Saturday, skies are expected to clear up in time for a planned women’s rights march downtown. However, gusty winds could sweep over most of the area, Kittell said. 

The third and final storm is expected to arrive early Sunday morning and hit peak intensity in the afternoon. The storm could dump between 2 and 3 inches of rain in coastal valley areas, while some foothill areas could get 4 to 6 inches of rain, Kittell said. 

“This one looks like the strongest of the three, and it could be the strongest we’ve seen in a number of years, especially considering our drought,” Kittell said.

Advertisement

brittny.mejia@latimes.com

Twitter: @Brittny_Mejia

 

ALSO

Southern California walloped by powerful storm; even bigger rainmaker coming Sunday

L.A. office market has best quarter since the financial crisis as entertainment and tech firms keep expanding

Uber pays $20 million to settle claims it deceived drivers about pay


UPDATES:

Advertisement

8:50 a.m.: This article was updated with tweets from the LAPD and the mayor’s office.

This article was originally published at 8:10 a.m.


Newsletter
Get our Essential California newsletter
Advertisement