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The Aurora shooting by the numbers -- an update

Caleb Medley, a survivor of the Aurora theater massacre, leaves the Arapahoe County Justice Center after James Holmes was convicted on all 165 counts. The verdict came Thursday, nearly three years to the day after Holmes stormed the theater, killing 12 and wounding 70.

Caleb Medley, a survivor of the Aurora theater massacre, leaves the Arapahoe County Justice Center after James Holmes was convicted on all 165 counts. The verdict came Thursday, nearly three years to the day after Holmes stormed the theater, killing 12 and wounding 70.

(Theo Stroomer / Getty Images )

After three months of testimony, a jury of nine women and three men convicted James Eagan Holmes of first-degree murder and attempted murder in one of the worst shooting rampages in American history.

As Arapahoe County Judge Carlos A. Samour Jr. read the names of the victims in court Thursday afternoon, the next steps in the lengthy process loomed:

What will happen to the gunman? How many choices do jurors have during the penalty phase of the trial? How long could it last?

Here’s a numerical look at the case and its impact.

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1.5 -- The number of days it took the jury to reach a verdict.

2 -- The number of choices the jury will have when the penalty phase of the trial begins: life in prison without a chance of parole, or the death penalty.

1 -- The number of months the penalty phase is expected to last. Attorneys will call more witnesses, and the same jurors will decide Holmes’ fate.

3 -- The number of people on Colorado’s death row. (By comparison, California’s has 743.)

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101 -- The number of people executed in Colorado before 1976.

1 -- The number of people executed in Colorado since 1976.

1997 -- The last time Colorado executed an inmate.

12 -- The number of people killed during the July 20, 2012, rampage at an Aurora, Colo., movie theater during a midnight showing of “The Dark Knight Rises.” During Holmes’ trial, Arapahoe County Dist. Atty. George H. Brauchler elicited each of their stories from survivors of the attack and first responders.

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70 -- The number of people who were injured during the shooting. Most of them testified in Division 201 of the Arapahoe County Justice Center as the prosecution laid out its case.

3 -- The number of survivors now in wheelchairs as a result of the shooting. Caleb Medley, who can no longer talk, testified by pointing at letters on an alphabet board. Stefan Moton piloted his electric wheelchair to the witness stand using mouth controls. Ashley Moser told the jury of how Holmes left her paralyzed, killed her 6-year-old daughter and caused her to miscarry.

165 -- The number of criminal counts of which Holmes was convicted. This includes 24 counts of first-degree murder, two for each of the dozen victims. Holmes acknowledged that he planned and carried out the attack but pleaded not guilty by reason of insanity.

256 -- The number of witnesses during the grueling trial, according to the Denver Post, which has kept a running tally.

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5 -- The number of jurors dismissed during the trial, leaving 19 to take the case through deliberations. Of those, 12 were chosen to decide Holmes’ fate and seven became alternates. Now, the 12 will decide whether he lives or dies.

13 -- The number of psychiatrists and psychologists who testified, four on behalf of the prosecution and nine on behalf of the defense. Prosecutors had the burden of proving that Holmes was sane when he blasted his way through the multiplex. The defense unsuccessfully argued that he was “floridly psychotic.”

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