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Readers React: Ski towns like Aspen should do more than just adapt to climate change

Aspen, at nearly 8,000 feet elevation, now averages 23 fewer days below freezing each year than it did before 1980, making snowfall more unreliable.

Aspen, at nearly 8,000 feet elevation, now averages 23 fewer days below freezing each year than it did before 1980, making snowfall more unreliable.

(John Moore / Getty Images)

To the editor: It seems Aspen, Colo., is handling global warming as Newport Beach is: It’s adapting, with locals protecting their property and working to maintain their economy. Aspen will house wealthy Houstonians who want to escape increasing Texas heat. Less wealthy Houstonians will just swelter at home. (“Rocky Mountain resorts race to defend their businesses against climate change,” July 28)

Aspen understands that its average temperature may rise by up to 9 degrees by 2050, but it ignores what that means to Kansas farmers. Likewise, Newport Beach accepts the fact that sea levels are rising, but the city hasn’t really looked the problem in the eye and considered what it can do to mitigate the problem. It will raise the sea walls slightly, protect itself near-term and not look too far ahead.

If Congress were to hear from wealthy individuals in Houston, Aspen and Newport asking for action on climate change, the representatives would respond. Congress can act; it just needs a push.

Mark Tabbert, Newport Beach

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To the editor: No skiing? Bummer. I love skiing.

Is it too late to express our deep thanks to paid deniers and friends who have kept us in thrall, or must we admit it’s on us that we were bamboozled? The prestigious Bell Labs warned us about climate change in 1958.

No skiing? How about relocating 300 million-plus people globally if the sea-level rise predicted by the respected climate scientist James Hansen occurs? His excellent track record and the urgings of dozens of Nobel laureates may spur us to continue the work of President Obama on climate change.

There are strong remedies on the shelves of Congress, such as the revenue-neutral carbon fee and dividend. But don’t hold your breath if the deniers and the timid continue to haunt the place.

Jan Freed, Los Angeles

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