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11 Images

An evening at Angelini Osteria

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The tiny Angelini Osteria, which Gino Angelini opened in 2001, is noisy and full of energy, without much elbow room. Here, diners make the best of it by eating at the bar. (Anne Cusack / Los Angeles Times)
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Stinco di vitello (roasted veal shank), one of the most requested dishes at Angelini Osteria, is a Friday night special. (Anne Cusack / Los Angeles Times)
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Castro Hernandez rolls out pizza dough to be baked in the wood-burning oven behind him. (Anne Cusack / Los Angeles Times)
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Manager Gind Rindone carves the stinco (veal shank), a Friday night special. (Anne Cusack / Los Angeles Times)
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Angelini Osteria’s stinco is served with potatoes and vegetables. (Anne Cusack / Los Angeles Times)
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A caprese salad — bufala cheese, heirloom tomatoes and basil — at Angelini Osteria. (Anne Cusack / Los Angeles Times)
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Lasagna verde — layers of pasta with beef and veal ragù. (Anne Cusack / Los Angeles Times)
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Pizza burrata just out of the wood-burning oven. (Anne Cusack / Los Angeles Times)
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The bombolotti (which might be bombolotti, or it might be rigatoni, as shown) in amatriciana sauce is flecked with house-cured guanciale, cured pork jowl. (Anne Cusack / Los Angeles Times)
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Chef-owner Gino Angelini opened the restaurant in 2001. (Anne Cusack / Los Angeles Times)
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Angelini Osteria feels like an ongoing festa. (Anne Cusack / Los Angeles Times)
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