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Two of Hawaii’s national parks will increase admission fees to $25

It will cost $25 to enter Haleakala National Park in Maui starting June 1.
(Tor Johnson / Hawaii Tourism Agency)

Plan to dig a little deeper into your wallet if you’re going to visit one of Hawaii’s national parks soon.

Haleakala National Park on Maui and Hawaii Volcanoes National Park on Hawaii Island will increase fees from $20 to $25 per vehicle starting Thursday.

For pedestrians and bicyclists, the fee will climb from $10 to $12. Passes issued by rangers are good for entry for three days.

Two visitors watch as molten lava spews from Kilauea Volcano at Hawaii Volcanoes National Park.
(Tor Johnson / Hawaii Tourism Agency)
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Insider tip: For $5 more, you can buy a Tri-Park Pass that’s good for a year. The pass allows unlimited admission to Haleakala and Hawaii Volcanoes, and the lesser-known Puuhonua o Honaunau National Historical Park in Kona on Hawaii Island.

Visitors to Hawaii Volcanoes National Park trek along Devastation Trail, which cuts through landscape forever changed by a still-active volcano.
(Kirk Lee Aeder / Island of Hawaii Visitors Bureau)

Tri-Park will cost $30 come Thursday, but you can snag one for $25 if you buy one by the end of May.

The increased fees will bring Hawaii’s two national parks in line fee-wise with other parks that provide similar services. Eighty percent of the money collected is used for upkeep and improvements at the individual parks.

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The remaining 20% helps fund National Park Service sites that don’t charge admission.

The entrance fee will remain at $5 per vehicle per week for visitors to Puuhonua o Honaunau National Historical Park, the site of a place of refuge for ancient natives on the Island of Hawaii.
(Tor Johnson / Hawaii Tourism Agency)

The entrance fee at Puuhonua will remain the same: $5 per vehicle and $3 per pedestrian or bicyclist. A pass is good for seven days.

The historical park is on the site of an ancient place of refuge. People who had committed a crime or offended a chief could seek sanctuary there. The punishment for offenders who couldn’t reach such a site was death. Native Hawaiians still consider it a sacred site.

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travel@latimes.com

@latimestravel


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