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AirTran booking website and loyalty program move to Southwest

Southwest and AirTran
Southwest Airlines moves toward completing the merge with AirTran Airways by blending websites and frequent-flier programs. Earlier this year Southwest rolled out a new logo for the expanded company.
(Southwest Airlines)

Fliers looking for AirTran Airways flights won’t find them on Airtran.com anymore. The website now introduces customers to Southwest Airlines, which bought the airline in 2011 and, by the end of the year, promises to have fully integrated the two companies.

If you have bookmarked Airtran.com, it will take you to a sort of hybrid site. “You’ve landed here because airtran.com is no longer available,” says the AirTran-Southwest website, which still display’s AirTran’s logo.

“As we move toward the completion of the AirTran and Southwest brand integration at the end of 2014, we want to welcome you into the Southwest family....”

Besides the merging of the websites, members A+ Rewards, AirTran’s loyalty program,  have been transferred to Rapid Rewards on Southwest, the company announced Sunday. All credits that haven’t expired as of Nov. 1 will be moved over at a rate of 1,200 points per credit, the website says. (Here are more details on the frequent-flier program changes from the Points Guy.)

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AirTran international flights to the Dominican Republic and Mexico as well as domestic routes have been rebranded as Southwest flights.

AirTran’s last flight is set for Dec. 28 when it will retrace its first flight from Atlanta to Tampa, Fla., in 1993 under the name ValuJet Airlines. The flight is full, a Southwest spokesperson says.

Southwest bought AirTran in 2011 for $1.4 billion and is now in the final stages of completing the merger. The purchase made Southwest the second-largest airline in the U.S., after Delta Air Lines.


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