Peru
10 Images

Lima, Peru

Peru
Lima is enjoying a civic and cultural resurgence. Nightlife has returned to the once dangerous historic downtown, where authorities have illuminated major colonial buildings as part of a full-scale restoration effort. New restaurants, good hotels, fine art galleries and trendy nightspots abound, luring tourists back. (Karel Navarro/Getty Images For The Times)
Peru
The Jazz Zone club provides a showcase for musicians like saxophonist Jean Pierre Magnet, who experiments with fusions of jazz and música criolla, a blend of Spanish, Indian and African elements, with his band, Peru Jazz. (Karel Navarro/Getty Images For The Times)
Peru
In Lima, Peru, artists like Manuel Miranda, playing the Andean instrument waqra phuku, are updating Peru’s rich musical traditions with contemporary elements of jazz, rock, salsa, reggae and electronica. (Karel Navarro/Getty Images For The Times)
Peru
A cook prepares cuy, a traditional Peruvian dish, in a restaurant in downtown Lima. (Karel Navarro/Getty Images For The Times)
Peru
For his upcoming album, “Brujos Voladores” (Flying Wizards), Peruvian musician Manuel Miranda blows on flutes and whistles made of wood, stone and pelican bone, evoking the mysteries of the cosmos, the primitive search for water, the origin of civilization. (Karel Navarro/Getty Images For The Times)
Peru
Novalima, Peru’s newest multinational ensemble, creates a powerful fusion of electronica with intoxicating Afro-Peruvian percussion and vocals. (Karel Navarro/Getty Images For The Times)
Peru
The image of the Lord of the Miracles is carried by members of a religious group in Lima’s downtown. About 80% of Peru’s population is Roman Catholic. (Karel Navarro/Getty Images For The Times)
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Peru’s flag flies near the main square and the Government Palace. (Karel Navarro/Getty Images For The Times)
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Peru’s music group Novalima performs in a music studio. (Karel Navarro/Getty Images For The Times)
Peru
Children play on the “El Puente de Los Suspiros” bridge, Barranco’s landmark Bridge of Sighs, a favorite lovers’ hideaway since the 1800s. (Karel Navarro/Getty Images For The Times)
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