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15 Images

Frida Kahlo Exhibit

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The lobby of the Museo del Palacio de Bellas Artes in Mexico City, where Mexico’s largest exhibition of Frida Kahlo’s artwork is on display through Aug. 19. (Jennifer Szymaszek / Museo del Palacio de Bellas Artes)
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“Thinking of Death,” 1943. Kahlo had a lifelong preoccupation with themes of physical infirmity and mortality. This portrait is the one used for posters of the Mexico City exhibition. (Jennifer Szymaszek / Museo del Palacio de Bellas Artes)
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“The Two Fridas” was painted in 1939, when the artist and muralist Diego Rivera were divorced. It suggests her pain over the separation and illustrates a common themes of introspection. (Jennifer Szymaszek / Museo del Palacio de Bellas Artes)
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A detail from “The Two Fridas” (1939) shows the artist holding a pendant painted with a portrait of then ex-husband Diego Rivera depicted as a child. (Jennifer Szymaszek / Museo del Palacio de Bellas Artes)
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Kahlo painted “Self Portrait on the Border Between Mexico and the United States” (1932) while in the U.S. with Diego Rivera as he worked on murals. (Jennifer Szymaszek / Museo del Palacio de Bellas Artes)
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Kahlo’s “Self Portrait With Velvet Outfit” (1926) is her earliest known self-portrait, painted when she was 19. (Jennifer Szymaszek / Museo del Palacio de Bellas Artes)
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In “The Love-Embrace of the Universe” (1949), Kahlo holds an infant-like Diego Rivera as she’s embraced by a mother Mexico. (Jennifer Szymaszek / Museo del Palacio de Bellas Artes)
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“Frida Kahlo and Diego Rivera” (1931). A number of works in the tribute exhibition have never been shown publicly in Mexico, or not for many years. It marks the 100th anniversary of her birth, July 6, 1907. (Jennifer Szymaszek / Museo del Palacio de Bellas Artes)
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“Pancho Villa and Adelita” (1927) includes a portrait of the Mexican hero. (Jennifer Szymaszek / Museo del Palacio de Bellas Artes)
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Frida Kahlo’s “Carma” (1946). The exhibition includes 65 oils, 45 drawings, 11 watercolors and five prints. (Jennifer Szymaszek / Museo del Palacio de Bellas Artes)
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A page from Frida Kahlo’s diary, on display in the drawings section of the exhibition. (Jennifer Szymaszek / Museo del Palacio de Bellas Artes)
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Photograph in the exhibition of Frida Kahlo as a 4-year-old child with her sisters, taken by her father, Guillermo Kahlo, in 1911. (Jennifer Szymaszek / Museo del Palacio de Bellas Artes)
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This photo, “Frida With Necklace,” was taken by Esther Borm in 1928, when the artist was 21. Kahlo died at age 47. (Jennifer Szymaszek / Museo del Palacio de Bellas Artes)
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Diego Rivera and Frida Kahlo in a photo titled “Midnight in the New Workers School” (1933), by Lucienne Bloch. (Jennifer Szymasek / Museum of Fine Arts Palace Mexico)
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Samples of Frida Kahlo’s personal correspondence in the Mexico City exhibition reveal a warmer, less formal side than the ones depicted in her self-portraits. (Jennifer Szymaszek / Museo del Palacio de Bellas Artes)
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