Mt. Whitney
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Climbing Mt. Whitney

Mt. Whitney
Slogging up the highest peak in the contiguous U.S. allows climbers to reach for something larger than themselves. (Anacleto Rapping / LAT)
Mt. Whitney
It’s a balancing act, as climbers strive to test their mettle and the Forest Service works to protect them from themselves. (Anacleto Rapping / LAT)
Mt. Whitney
It’s not a race: Avoid altitude sickness while trekking up the mountain by taking it slow. (Anacleto Rapping / LAT)
Mt. Whitney
Garry Oye, a district ranger of Mount Whitney, stands over Whitney’s vast lands. (Anacleto Rapping / LAT)
Mt. Whitney
The sun rises over Mt. Whitney and the Eastern Sierra range as seen from Lone Pine. (Anacleto Rapping / LAT)
Mt. Whitney
While scoring a successful climb can be a life-altering experience, many who make the attempt are overconfident and underprepared. “There’s a perception out there that this is a cakewalk,” says ranger Garry Oye. (Anacleto Rapping / LAT)
Mt. Whitney
John Radovich, from left, Barbara Brown, Catherine Whittington and George Denny set off through the knee-deep waters of Big Tujunga Creek on their way to scale Mt. Lukens’ 5,074-foot summit. The rocky route is a prime training ground for their hike up 14,497-foot Mt. Whitney in the next few months. (Axel Koester / For The Times)
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