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Instagramming brides and grooms, this Vegas wedding chapel is for you

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This immersive “Til Death Do Us Part” chapel is a work of art that the Palms Casino Resort hopes will be picture perfect for social-media-savvy couples.
(Clint Jenkins)

There’s a new wedding chapel in Las Vegas, and it’s designed with Instagram brides and grooms in mind. With Valentine’s Day right around the corner, the Palms Casino Resort is offering couples a chance to tie the knot inside a life-sized black-and-white drawing by Guatemalan artist Joshua Vides.

The chapel, designed to be an immersive experience, is tucked inside the Pearl Concert Theater. It opened Jan. 18 and measures 800 square feet.

The cheapest wedding option, called “Our Marriage Looks Perfect — On Instagram,” costs $250 and gives you an hour inside the chapel “to capture the perfect pictures for all your social channels,” a resort statement said. You have to bring your own photographer too.

Other packages that include ceremonies run $500 to $5,500.

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ALL Photos By Denise Truscello
The pop-up wedding chapel at Palms Casino Resort is open through spring.
(Denise Truscello)

The artwork, officially called “Til Death Do Us Part,” will be open until spring.

It’s part of the resort’s $700-million renovation that puts original art at the top of the guest experience. “You walk around and feel like you’re either at a museum or a gallery,” said Tal Cooperman, the resort’s creative director.

Palms officials won’t say how much it has spent on recent art acquisitions, but did say the resort, which opened in 2001, wants to attract visitors who care about art.

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“I felt like the Palms of old used to be the coolest place in Vegas,” Cooperman said. “People didn’t even care about the Strip at that point. They wanted to be here because this was where all the cool people were.”

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A life-size sculpture of a Lamborghini by Benedict Radcliffe at Palms Casino Resort.
(Clint Jenkins)

The Palms’ art walk begins at the resort’s porte- cochere where guests can see a Lamborghini Countach sculpture by artist Benedict Radcliffe. It shows the shell of the sports car made from thin steel bars and then coated with fluorescent orange powder. The London-based sculptor has been creating such cars since 2005.

Inside the resort, there are original works behind the reception desk and at the casino cage, where you can find a commissioned painting called “I Wear My Money on My Face” by Timothy Curtis.

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Andy Warhol paintings of dollar signs hang above a bar at the Palms in Las Vegas.
(Clint Jenkins)

Dollar signs painted by Andy Warhol are prominently displayed in the high-limit gaming area. More Warhol works can be found inside Scotch 80 Prime, the resort’s steakhouse.

The restaurant’s art collection begins in the entryway where guests are greeted by Damien Hirst’s “Grecian Nude,” and “Small Lie,” a work by Brian Donnelly, a.k.a. KAWS. Scott Hove’s “Cakeland” covers the walls in a women’s restroom stall.

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A couple known as DabsMyla were commissioned to create the mural found in a stairwell.
(Clint Jenkins)
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People have to work a bit to find a Pop Art mural by Australian husband and wife DabsMyla, which brightens a stairwell leading from the hotel’s 55th floor, home to APEX Social Club, to the 56th floor, the site of Italian restaurant Vetri Cucina. The elevator ride is worth it to see the work.

Probably the biggest buzz surrounds the yet-to-be-unveiled bronze sculpture that will tower over the pool area starting this spring.

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“Demon With Bowl” is a 60-foot sculpture crafted by Damien Hirst in 2014.
(Prudence Cuming Associates / Damien Hirst and Science Ltd.)

“Demon With Bowl,” another Hirst work, will rise 60 feet when fully assembled at the resort’s new day club. It is so big and so heavy that after being displayed at the Palazzo Grassi museum in Venice, Italy, the sculpture had to be taken apart for shipment to America.

“Just watching it being built out here is kind of insane,” Cooperman said. “The average kid that’s going to come here to the pool, to the day club, is going to take a couple hundred photos of that thing because they’ve never seen anything that tall or that big before . … It’s one of the coolest things I’ve ever seen.”

travel@latimes.com

@latimestravel


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