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From the Archives: 1939 drive to Nevada’s Mt. Charleston

Image from 1939 of the road between Las Vegas, Nevada, and Mt. Charleston. The car is a 1939 Hudson Country Club sport sedan.
Image from 1939 of the road between Las Vegas, Nevada, and Mt. Charleston. The car is a 1939 Hudson Country Club sport sedan.
(Lynn J. Rogers / Los Angeles Times)

For his “Scout Party” travelogue column, Los Angeles Times Outdoor Editor Lynn J. Rogers took this image while driving between Las Vegas, Nevada, and Mt. Charleston.

In his Feb. 26, 1939, column, Rogers wrote:

...After a hasty greeting and an introduction to Bob Griffith, owner of the Mt. Charleston Lodge and past president of the Las Vegas Chamber of Commerce, we set forth for a close-by rugged range of snow-capped mountain peaks.

Taking the main highway leading to Reno, we quickly reached the turn-off to Nevada National Forest and Mt. Charleston. As the road wound higher we were treated to the unusual sight of Joshuas, a typical desert species of plant usually connotated with burning sun and sand but this time bedecked in a fleecy mantle of cold whiteness.

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The car gradually climbed until we found ourselves coursing smoothly through glades of lofty, snow-covered pine trees stretching mightily toward the sky. We paused before entering the Nevada National Forest to put skid chains on our tires and take some pictures. …

After checking Google Maps, I believe this road is now Nevada State Route 157 – also known as King Canyon Road.

Mt. Charleston, a 11,91-foot6 peak, provides a year-round escape for Las Vegas residents.

See more from the Los Angeles Times archives here

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