Advertisement
Share

Texas and other states ease COVID-19 rules despite warnings

×

Gov. Greg Abbott says Texas is lifting its mask mandate, making it the largest state to end an order intended to prevent the spread of the coronavirus that has killed more than 43,000 Texans.

Texas on Tuesday became the biggest state to lift its face mask rule, joining a rapidly growing movement by governors and other leaders across the U.S. to loosen COVID-19 restrictions despite pleas from health officials not to let down their guard yet.

The state will also do away with limits on the number of diners who can be served indoors, said Republican Gov. Greg Abbott, who made the announcement at a restaurant in Lubbock.

The governors of Michigan and Louisiana likewise eased up on bars, restaurants and other businesses Tuesday, as did the mayor of San Francisco.

“Removing statewide mandates does not end personal responsibility,” said Abbott, speaking from a crowded dining room where many of those surrounding him were not wearing masks. “It’s just that now state mandates are no longer needed.”

Advertisement

A year into the pandemic, politicians and ordinary Americans alike say they have grown tired of rules meant to stem the spread of the coronavirus, which has killed over a half-million people in the United States. Some places are lifting infection control measures; in other places, people are ignoring them.

Top health officials, including the head of the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, have responded by begging people repeatedly not to risk another deadly wave of contagion just when the nation is making progress in vaccinating people and victory over the pandemic may be in sight.

U.S. cases have plunged more than 70% over the past two months from an average of nearly 250,000 new infections a day, while the average number of deaths per day has plummeted about 40% since mid-January.

Advertisement

But the two curves have leveled off abruptly in the past several days and have even risen slightly, and the numbers are still running at alarmingly high levels, with an average of about 2,000 deaths and 68,000 cases per day. Health officials are increasingly worried about virus variants.

“We stand to completely lose the hard-earned ground we have gained,” CDC Director Dr. Rochelle Walensky warned on Monday.

Even so, many states are allowing restaurants to resume indoor dining, reopening movie theaters and expanding mass gatherings, while Americans are eager to socialize again.

An Indianapolis-area bar was filled with maskless patrons over the weekend. In Southern California, people waited in lines that snaked through a parking lot on a recent weekday afternoon for the chance to shop and eat at Downtown Disney, part of the Disneyland. (The theme park’s rides remain closed.) And Florida is getting ready to welcome students on spring break.

Advertisement

“People want to stay safe, but at the same time, the fatigue has hit,” said Ryan Luke, who is organizing a weekend rally in Eagle, Idaho, to encourage people to patronize businesses that don’t require masks. “We just want to live a quasi-normal life.”

Officials had projected it would be July before the U.S. had shots for all adults, but President Biden said Tuesday that milestone would come in May.

Michael Junge argued against a mask mandate when officials in the Missouri tourist town of Branson passed one and said he hasn’t enforced it in his Lost Boys Barber Company. He said he is sick of it.

“I think the whole thing is a joke honestly,” he said. “They originally said that this was going to go for a month and they have pushed it out to indefinitely. ... It should have been done a long time ago.”

Advertisement

In San Francisco, an upbeat Mayor London Breed announced that California has given the green light to indoor dining and the reopening of the city’s movie theaters and gyms.

Florida is getting ready for spring break travelers to flock to its sunny beaches, even though the state is considered to be in an “active outbreak,” along with Connecticut, Delaware, Georgia, New Jersey, New York, Rhode Island and South Carolina, according to the data-tracking website CovidActNow.

Florida Gov. Rick DeSantis made it clear during his annual State of the State speech Tuesday that he welcomes more visitors to Florida in his drive to keep the state’s economy thriving.

Municipalities can impose their own mask rules and curfews, restrict beach access and place some limits on bars and restaurants, but some have virtually no such measures in place ahead of the season.

Advertisement

Miami Beach will require masks both indoors and out and will restrict the number of people allowed on the beach as well as in bars and restaurants.

“If you want to party without restrictions, then go somewhere else. Go to Vegas,” Miami Beach City Manager Raul Aguila said during a recent virtual meeting. “We will be taking a zero-tolerance attitude towards that behavior.”

In Michigan, a group called All Business Is Essential has resisted Gov. Gretchen Whitmer’s virus policies, and many people are abandoning mask requirements and other measures, said group leader Erik Kiilunen.

Advertisement

“At some point you’ve got to look yourself in the mirror and say, ‘Do I want a zero-risk life?’” he said. “It’s become a farce, really. People have quit living for a year, at what price?”

Whitmer announced a relaxation of the rules for Michigan restaurants and bars as well as other activities Tuesday.

“I think everybody wants things to get back the way they were,” said Aubrey D. Jenkins, the fire chief in Columbia, S.C., whose department issues dozens of $100 citations every weekend to bargoers who refuse to wear masks or keep their distance. “But we still have to be real cautious.”


Advertisement