Pakistan after Bhutto
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Pakistan after Bhutto

Pakistan after Bhutto
Pakistani riot police and barbed wire form a line to stop a small group of protesters from marching toward government buildings in Islamabad, the nation’s capital. (Carolyn Cole / Los Angeles Times)
Pakistan after Bhutto
Pakistani riot police line up to stop protesters from marching toward government buildings, including parliament, in Islamabad. The small group had gathered to protest the rule of President Pervez Musharraf. (Carolyn Cole / Los Angeles Times)
Pakistan after Bhutto
Syed Munawar Ali Gillani, 70, protests the killing of Benazir Bhutto. He was part of a small group of anti-Musharraf protesters attempting to march toward government buildings in Islamabad. (Carolyn Cole / Los Angeles Times)
Pakistan after Bhutto
Protesters are halted by Pakistani riot police, who prevented them from marching toward government buildings in Islamabad. (Carolyn Cole / Los Angeles Times)
Pakistan after Bhutto
Pakistani police monitor protesters as they voice their opposition to the government at a rally in Islamabad. A decision regarding when elections will be held is expected Wednesday. (Carolyn Cole / Los Angeles Times)
Pakistan after Bhutto
A vendor tends to his meat stall at a central Karachi marketplace. (Carolyn Cole / Los Angeles Times)
Pakistan
Men watch stock prices at the Karachi stock market. Businesses reopened after a three-day mourning period for Benazir Bhutto, however, trading was light. (Carolyn Cole / Los Angeles Times)
Pakistan
Businesses in Karachi reopened after a three-day mourning period for Benazir Bhutto. A man washes pots and pans in a marketplace cafe, where business was light. Many stores remained shut. (Carolyn Cole / Los Angeles Times)
Pakistan
Musarat Khan mourns the death of leader Benazir Bhutto at a prayer gathering in Karachi. “She is a martyr,” Khan said when asked about Bhutto’s death. Several hundred mourners gathered at the Karachi home of former prime minister Benazir Bhutto and her family. Later in the day her son was named her successor as leader of the Pakistan People’s Party, with the call for elections to go forward. (Carolyn Cole / Los Angeles Times)
Pakistan
Mourners gather at the Karachi home of former prime minister Benazir Bhutto and her family. Women cried as prayers were delivered for their slain leader. Later in the day her son was named her successor as chairman of the PPP party, with the call for elections to go forward. (Carolyn Cole / Los Angeles Times)
Pakistan
Pakistan People’s Party supporters drive through Karachi waving flags. (Carolyn Cole / Los Angeles Times)
Pakistan
Supporter of the Benazir Bhutto march and chant through the streets of Karachi, Pakistan near the Bhutto home while a prayer gathering goes on inside. (Carolyn Cole / Los Angeles Times)
Pakistan
Members of the Pakistani Rangers patrol the streets of Karachi on the third day of mourning for former prime minister Benazir Bhutto. The city was calm through the day. (Carolyn Cole / Los Angeles Times)
Empty street
Posters of Bhutto remain visible in parts of Karachi, the southern port city that was Bhutto’s home base. (Carolyn Cole / Los Angeles Times)
Soldier
Since Bhutto’s death, Pakistan has been in a state of virtual shutdown, as soldiers strive to contain the violence. (Carolyn Cole / Los Angeles Times)
Tank
As of Saturday, Pakistan’s Interior Ministry said that violence had damaged or destroyed hundreds of banks, stores, gas stations, railway cars and rail stations. (Carolyn Cole / Los Angeles Times)
Karachi crowd
A row of shops was torched Saturday morning in the center of Karachi as violence continued in many areas of Pakistan. Fires set a day earlier continued to smolder, some being fed with new fuel by protesters. (Carolyn Cole / Los Angeles Times)
Pakistan crowd
Young men and boys try to scare off outsiders Saturday with stones and pistols in Karachi, Pakistan, the hometown and political stronghold of Benazir Bhutto. They vented their anger at the lack of government security that they believe led to Bhutto’s death. (Carolyn Cole / Los Angeles Times)
Pakistan burning
Fires set a day earlier in Karachi, Pakistan, continue to burn on Saturday. The streets were filled with police and protesters on the second day of a three-day mourning period for slain former Prime Minister Benazir Bhutto. (Carolyn Cole / Los Angeles Times)
Bhutto assassination
Vehicles set on fire by protesters angry over the death of Bhutto light up the sky in Karachi, Pakistan. (Shakil Adil / Associated Press)
Bhutto assassination
Bhutto’s body is carried out of Rawalpindi General Hospital. Doctors said they worked for more than half an hour trying to revive her. (Warrick Page / Getty Images)
Bhutto assassination
Pakistanis grieve at the hospital where Bhutto died. There was no immediate claim of responsibility for the attack, but President Pervez Musharraf blamed Islamic extremists and called on Bhutto’s allies to remain calm. “This is the work of those terrorists with whom we are engaged in war,” he said in a nationally televised speech.



Note: Some photos in this slide show graphically show the impact of the attack. (Farooq Naeem / AFP / Getty Images)
Bhutto assassination
Members of the crowd react to the carnage. (Aamir Qureshi / AFP / Getty Images)
Bhutto assassination
A supporter of Bhutto shows his bloody hands after the explosion. (T. Mughal / EPA)
Bhutto assassination
Rescue and recovery workers collect bodies at the attack site. (T. Mughal / EPA)
Bhutto assassination
A survivor is overcome with emotion after the attack, which killed at least 20 people in addition to Bhutto. (John Moore / Getty Images)
Bhutto assassination
Bhutto smiles from her car seconds before the attack. (John Moore / Getty Images)
Bhutto assassination
Bhutto waves as she leaves the rally. Today’s gathering was her first public appearance in Rawalpindi since she returned to Pakistan in the fall. At the time, she had planned a rally there, but the government canceled it for security reasons. (B.K. Bangash / Associated Press)
Bhutto assassination
Bhutto greets her supporters at the rally. After the attack, the crowd erupted in anger, some shouting, “Musharraf is a dog!” in reference to Pakistani President Pervez Musharraf. (T. Mughal / EPA)
Bhutto assassination
The death of Bhutto, who twice served as Pakistan’s prime minister, came 10 weeks after she narrowly survived a bombing that killed more than 150 people during a procession to mark her return from self-exile. She came back to her homeland to lead her Pakistan People’s Party in parliamentary elections next month. (Aamir Qureshi AFP / Getty Images)
Bhutto assassination
Former Pakistani Prime Minister Benazir Bhutto waves as she arrives in Rawalpindi to address her last public rally. She was assassinated just after the rally ended. (Mohammad Javed / Associated Press)
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