Business

Avoid these mistakes on Social Security and selling investments

BusinessColumnRetirementRetirement PlanningFinancePersonal FinanceMutual Funds
'There is no way to do a tax-free reinvestment'
Many people erroneously think they should grab Social Security as early as they can
There's a special way married couples can boost their Social Security payouts

Dear Liz: My wife and I, 63 and 62, plan to continue working till at least 65. We will begin collecting Social Security benefits in September. Our combined income is $58,000, we own our home outright, and we have no debt, no children, $84,000 in a traditional IRA and $90,000 in a stock portfolio.

I just sold a portion of a mutual fund for a $30,000 gain that is in the bank for the time being. How long do we have to reinvest without paying a capital gains tax? Or would it be best to pay the tax now, leave the money in the bank and be done with it?

Answer: Unless you sell another investment for a $30,000 loss to offset the gain, you're going to have to pay taxes on your profit.

"There is no way to do a tax-free reinvestment," said tax professional Eva Rosenberg, an enrolled agent who runs the TaxMama.com site. "And the time to ask questions like that is before you sell the mutual funds."

You still have time to avoid a much bigger mistake: signing up for Social Security now.

Your Social Security checks would be reduced $1 for every $2 you earn over a certain level, which this year is $15,480. That "earnings test" applies until you reach your full retirement age (which is 66, not 65, for both you and your wife). What's more, you would lock in lower benefits for life and give up a chance to boost your Social Security payout in a way that's available only to married couples who wait until full retirement age to start benefits. (More on that in a moment.)

Your savings are too small to generate much income, particularly if you want to minimize the chances of running out of money. You should be looking to maximize your Social Security benefits to help make up for that deficit. Your benefits grow substantially each year you put off applying for them, and most people will live past the break-even point where delaying benefits until full retirement age results in more money than taking them early.

Many people erroneously think they should grab Social Security as early as they can, but the Social Security system isn't going away, and you are likely to regret settling for a smaller check. Remember that your wife probably will outlive you and will have to get by on one check, so you should make sure your benefits are as big as they can be.

One way to do that is for the lower-earning spouse to claim spousal benefits at his or her full retirement age. Once the lower earner's benefit maxes out at age 70, he or she can switch if that benefit is larger.

But spousal benefits can't start until the higher earner files for his or her own benefit. If the higher earner waits until full retirement age to apply, he or she has the option to "file and suspend" — a maneuver that lets the spouse claim spousal benefits while leaving the higher earner's benefit untouched so it can continue to grow.

This "claim now, claim more later" strategy is available only to people who wait until their full retirement age to start.

Your tax question and your plan to start Social Security early indicate you could really use some sessions with a fee-only financial planner. Such a consultation is a good idea for everyone as they're approaching retirement, but in your case, it's essential.

Stay humble about financial smarts

Dear Liz: I think you were way too hard on the young man who said his 30-year-old girlfriend's lack of retirement savings was a potential deal breaker. You told him to get off his high horse. He was just being prudent.

Answer: It would be prudent to regard massive debt, alcoholism or drug use as deal breakers for a relationship. Elevating the young woman's lack of retirement savings to this level is just over the top. But let's hear what the young man himself had to say:

Dear Liz: I want to say thank you for taking the time to write on my question. I was able to find a few charts online and show her [the power of compounded returns]. She got excited about it and is now putting in to get the company match (5%).

Thank you very much for putting me in my place. I did not mean to come across as if I was better. I have been very lucky to have been able to save and be taught about compounding at an early age.

Answer: One of the potential hazards of being good with money is arrogance. We can become convinced that we know better and that other people should do things our way. It takes some humility to understand that not everyone has had the advantages we've had or been able to take in the information as we've done. Understanding that makes it easier to find compromises in a relationship that work for both parties.

Good luck with your relationship. She sounds like a keeper.

Questions may be sent to 3940 Laurel Canyon, No. 238, Studio City, CA 91604, or by using the "Contact" form at asklizweston.com. Distributed by No More Red Inc.

Copyright © 2014, Los Angeles Times
Related Content
BusinessColumnRetirementRetirement PlanningFinancePersonal FinanceMutual Funds
Comments
Loading