ARTS & ENTERTAINMENT Ministry of Gossip

Alec Baldwin: 'I asked for no special treatment' from cops

'I told both officers I was happy to accept the summons and go,' Alec Baldwin tweets
Alec Baldwin takes issue with disorderly conduct allegation
Officer's 'claims ... of disorderly conduct are either a distortion or outright lie,' Alec Baldwin says

Alec Baldwin spent some time online Tuesday night explaining himself after a morning run-in with police that resulted in two summonses for the actor and a subsequent amusing blurt by him on Twitter. 

The former "30 Rock" star was stopped by cops in Manhattan for driving the wrong way on Fifth Avenue. He couldn't produce ID when it was requested and, according to police, got belligerent. The handcuffs went on and Baldwin was taken to a local police station to be properly identified. 

The blurt happened Tuesday around 12:30 p.m. EDT, when Baldwin, via Twitter, called New York City "a mismanaged carnival of stupidity that is desperate for revenue and anxious to criminalize behavior once thought benign." (Hard to argue with that, eh? Yes, we admit our West Coast bias.)

He also complained about getting hauled in for something minor while paparazzi went untouched in their swarm around the door of the building where he and his wife and child live.

Baldwin's further explanation came later that day, around 10 p.m. EDT, through a series of tweets. Though he first named the officer as "Moreno," he corrected himself later to say it was "Montero."

He took issue with the accusation that he'd been disorderly (his summonses were for the bike infraction and alleged disorderly conduct). 

"I asked both police officers today to ticket me. If they contend that I asked for special treatment, they are lying," he wrote. "If you don't have ID in NY when they write you a summons, they can take you in. Officer Moreno did not know me. Officer Weinstein did."

"Moreno shouted, 'Let's do this the right way!' And handcuffed me."

"I told both officers I was happy to accept the summons and go. One officer seemed inclined toward that. Moreno did not," Baldwin continued. "So, when a cop lies to protect themself, what do I plead in court on July 14th? Even if you are innocent, w witnesses, what do you do?"

"My only point is that claims by Moreno of disorderly conduct are either a distortion or outright lie. Moreno lied in her report. I simply want people to know that I asked for no special treatment. It was a ticket for riding a bicycle. I can handle it. Correction: Officer's name is Montero."

Baldwin seemed to have a sense of humor about it in the end, however -- on Wednesday he retweeted a link to a Taiwanese Animators video "re-creation" of the incident. The outfit's animated "news" pieces are known for their over-the-top depictions of incidents for which there are few or no real-life images. 

Copyright © 2014, Los Angeles Times
Related Content
Comments
Loading